OP – The Blog

September 15th, 2010

Throwing Common Sense to the Wind–Mount Rainier

Posted By Jay Goodrich
Tatoosh Range, Mount Rainier NP, Washington by Jay Goodrich

Tatoosh Range, Mount Rainier NP, Washington © Jay Goodrich

Earlier this week I made a post on my blog about the new HDR function on the iPhone. The photo that I posted was taken while on a late evening stroll in Mount Rainier National Park. My wife and I have never been known to be that cautious or have any common sense between the two of us, so when most of our friends heard that we were going to do a late afternoon hike in the Paradise Valley with our 5 year old daughter and 1 year old son, they gasped. For us it was a typical Saturday. We worked in the morning around the house then packed up the kids and took a drive. We didn’t start our hike until about 5:30pm. The mission was to get to the top of the Paradise Trail, have dinner while the sun set, and then walk down in the dark. All went according to plan with the exception of the kids getting a bit cold at the top, especially the boy since he was in the back pack.

Mount Rainier after Sunset with Stars by Jay Goodrich

Mount Rainier after Sunset with Stars © Jay Goodrich

These little jaunts are especially important to me because I travel quite a bit. So spending even a few hours with the family is a must. As a photographer, when the light decides to create magic like it did that night last weekend, the camera has to come out. Heather understands, but still pushes me to keep up, we did see 5 bears on the trail, one was a sow with two cubs and Heather wasn’t looking to defend her family alone. Here comes more of that lack of common sense…she trusts the nature photographer to defend her. In order to accomplish this I do what any father/photographer would–I run…alot. I probably hiked 7 miles for the total 3.5. Oh well, my legs are not quite as sore now–I can finally walk down the stairs without moaning in complete agony. If you want to play you gotta pay or something like that.

The Tatoosh Range at Sunset, Mount Rainier NP by Jay Goodrich

The Tatoosh Range at Sunset, Mount Rainier NP © Jay Goodrich

What was super cool about this trip is that my 5 year old daughter hiked the whole trail, this was by far the most strenuous hike she has ever been on and a complete surprise to me. They grow up so fast that you can’t even imagine. We had so much fun last weekend, that we are thinking about doing it again this coming one. Only time will tell if Heather and I throw more common sense to the wind. What’s that saying? What ever does not kill you makes you stronger?

 

Please leave a comment

  1. Gary Crabbe / Enlightened Images Says:

    I know just what you mean Jay. I too was surprised when my then 5-year old daughter made the hike from Happy Isles all the way to the top of Vernal Falls via the Mist Trail. I was wow’d & proud. :)

    Cheers,

    Gary

  2. Jay Goodrich Says:

    Thanks for the comment Gary. It’s cool to know that you have experienced that too.

  3. Ron Richins Says:

    That first photo is beyond awesome. I don’t know how some people are able to see such sights. You and Adrian Klein, who has kind of similar picture, must have a special ability to conjure up such conditions.

  4. Mount Rainier in the Clouds with Stars | jay goodrich photographer inc. Says:

    […] After such an amazing evening hike and dinner with Heather and the kids I couldn’t help myself this month. I had to use one of the images as a photo of the month. I was fortunate enough to capture this photograph at the bottom of the Paradise Trail as we finished our hike in complete darkness. I decided to throw all the rules of composition out the window and include way more of the sky above rather than the foreground of wildflowers that was at my feet, which was almost black to the naked eye. Since these clouds were rolling along at a fast pace all I needed to create the above effect was a 30 second shutter speed. In some cases it takes much longer shutter speeds to see even the slightest bit of movement in clouds, but not on this night. The scene looks almost like the volcano itself is outgassing during an eruption. Taken with a Canon 1D Mark III, 16-35mm f2.8 lens, Gitzo tripod, Kirk ballhead, and mastered in Adobe Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5. You can read more about the evening and see additional images on my weekly post to the Outdoor Photographer Magazine Blog. […]

  5. Jay Goodrich Says:

    It doesn’t happen every day. I get lucky by being out there as much as I can. Thank you for the compliments. I cannot tell you how much that means to me.

  6. September 2010 Photo of the Month | JAY GOODRICHJAY GOODRICH Says:

    […] After such an amazing evening hike and dinner with Heather and the kids I couldn’t help myself this month. I had to use one of the images as a photo of the month. I was fortunate enough to capture this photograph at the bottom of the Paradise Trail as we finished our hike in complete darkness. I decided to throw all the rules of composition out the window and include way more of the sky above rather than the foreground of wildflowers that was at my feet, which was almost black to the naked eye. Since these clouds were rolling along at a fast pace all I needed to create the above effect was a 30 second shutter speed. In some cases it takes much longer shutter speeds to see even the slightest bit of movement in clouds, but not on this night. The scene looks almost like the volcano itself is outgassing during an eruption. Taken with a Canon 1D Mark III, 16-35mm f2.8 lens, Gitzo tripod, Kirk ballhead, and mastered in Adobe Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5. You can read more about the evening and see additional images on my weekly post to the Outdoor Photographer Magazine Blog. […]

  7. September 2010 Photo of the Month – JAY GOODRICH Says:

    […] After such an amazing evening hike and dinner with Heather and the kids I couldn’t help myself this month. I had to use one of the images as a photo of the month. I was fortunate enough to capture this photograph at the bottom of the Paradise Trail as we finished our hike in complete darkness. I decided to throw all the rules of composition out the window and include way more of the sky above rather than the foreground of wildflowers that was at my feet, which was almost black to the naked eye. Since these clouds were rolling along at a fast pace all I needed to create the above effect was a 30 second shutter speed. In some cases it takes much longer shutter speeds to see even the slightest bit of movement in clouds, but not on this night. The scene looks almost like the volcano itself is outgassing during an eruption. Taken with a Canon 1D Mark III, 16-35mm f2.8 lens, Gitzo tripod, Kirk ballhead, and mastered in Adobe Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5. You can read more about the evening and see additional images on my weekly post to the Outdoor Photographer Magazine Blog. […]

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