OP – The Blog

April 3rd, 2013

What to do in Mud Season?

Posted By Jerry Monkman
Rime ice at sunrise on the summit of New Hampshire's Mount Washington.

Rime ice at sunrise on the summit of New Hampshire's Mount Washington.

Late March and early April can be a tough time for nature photographers in New England. Known locally as mud season, this time of year is filled with landscapes of dirty, melting snow, deeply furrowed dirt roads, and forests without any color. A photographer can hope for good light and atmosphere and create images of stark beauty, or spend the days indoors editing winter photos while waiting for things to green up. I’ll do those things, but I also like to visit three types of places that provide ample photo opportunities this time of year: the high peaks and snowy ravines of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, the rocky coasts of Maine and New Hampshire, and the sweet-smelling, smoky sugar houses that are boiling sap down to maple syrup throughout the region.

A snowboarder in Tuckerman Ravine in New Hampshire's White Mountains.

A snowboarder in Tuckerman Ravine in New Hampshire's White Mountains.

Two kids enjoy maple sundaes at Folsom's Sugar House in Chester, New Hampshire.  Steam from boiling sap rises from the sugar house.

Two kids enjoy maple sundaes at Folsom's Sugar House in Chester, New Hampshire. Steam from boiling sap rises from the sugar house.

Dawn over the Atlantic Ocean at Fort Foster park in Kittery, Maine.

Dawn over the Atlantic Ocean at Fort Foster park in Kittery, Maine.

I had the pleasure of spending Friday night on the summit of New Hampshire’s Mount Washington. I was greeted by average weather for the summit: blowing snow, temps in the single digits, and sustained winds of 40 – 50 mph. Things cleared out over night though so I could take the photo that opens this post (to see more, visit my blog post from Monday: http://ecophotography.com/mount-washington-2/).

Have fun in the mud!

Cheers!
-Jerry

 

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