OP – The Blog

September 1st, 2011

Photo Critique Series: An Intimate, Wide-Angle Composition from Scotland

Posted By Michael Frye

Photo Critique Series: “Finnich Gorge” by David Dalziel from Michael Frye on Vimeo.

I decided to try something new for this latest critique, and record my thoughts with video screen capture. I hope this will create a more interactive, immersive experience, as if you were watching me do a portfolio review in a workshop. Let me know how you like it!

To see the best detail, be sure to watch the video in HD and click the four arrows in the lower-right corner of the video to expand it. Once expanded, I prefer to turn scaling off (in the upper-right corner).

This week’s photo was made by David Dalziel in Finnich Gorge, just north of David’s home in Glasgow, Scotland. Recently I wrote about the third dimension in photography, and how lens choice can affect our perception of depth and space in a photograph. Then in my last critique I showed an example of how a telephoto lens can compress space, flatten perspective, and create patterns. This time we’ll look at the opposite: a wide-angle composition that creates a sense of depth, even though it’s not a grand, sweeping landscape.

Watch the video to hear more of my thoughts about this photograph—and then let me know what you think! Do you agree with my comments about the top and bottom of the frame? Do you see any other ways of improving the image? What do you think about the color saturation? And let me know what you think about the video format for these critiques.

Thanks David for sharing your photograph! You can see more of his work on Flickr and on his web site.

If you like these critiques, share them with a friend! Email this article, or click on one of the buttons below to post it on Facebook or Twitter.

As part of being chosen for this critique Greg will receive a free 16×20 matted print courtesy of the folks at Aspen Creek Photo. If you’d like your images considered for future critiques, just upload them to the Flickr group I created for this purpose. If you’re not a Flickr member yet, joining is free and easy. You’ll have to read and accept the rules for the group before adding images, and please, no more than five photos per person per week. Thanks for participating!

—Michael Frye

Related Posts: The Third Dimension in Photography; Photo Critique Series: Patterns, Focal Points, and Telephoto Compression in a Palouse Country Landscape.

See all the critiques here.

Michael Frye is a professional photographer specializing in landscapes and nature. He is the author and photographer of The Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite, Yosemite Meditations, and Digital Landscape Photography: In the Footsteps of Ansel Adams and the Great Masters, plus the eBook Light & Land: Landscapes in the Digital Darkroom. He has written numerous magazine articles on the art and technique of photography, and his images have been published in over thirty countries around the world. Michael has lived either in or near Yosemite National Park since 1983, currently residing just outside the park in Mariposa, California.

In the Moment: Michael Frye's Landscape Photography Blog

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Please leave a comment

  1. Andrew Says:

    Love the new video critique! Please keep up the good work

  2. Joseph Says:

    I love this medium for critiquing images, especially from someone
    as qualified as youself. Thank you for this – my hopes are that
    the magazine continues with it. I teach photography, and this
    medium is GREAT. Joseph :o)

  3. Mike Houge Says:

    I think this was a great addition-I hope you will continue it.

  4. Houston Bryant Says:

    The video critique adds to the lessons and explains in ways text is unable to do.

  5. Michael Frye Says:

    Andrew, Joseph, Mike, and Houston, thanks for your comments! I’m glad you like the video format. I’ll certainly try it again, and maybe add some refinements.

  6. Kyle Says:

    Very cool video!! Very helpful and clear. Thanks!

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