OP – The Blog

May 2nd, 2013

Photo Of The Day by Edward Mendes

Posted By Christopher Robinson

 

McWay Falls by Edward Mendes

McWay Falls by Edward Mendes

I’ve seen photos of this location many times, but never in black & white. Edward Mendes shot today’s Photo Of The Day at McWay Falls along California’s legendary Big Sur coast. he submitted the photo to the new Black & White Special Issue Assignment which is open until May 7th.

Mendes describes the area and how he got this photo, “McWay falls is one of the most majestic waterfalls in the world with its elegant tumble over beautiful cliffs plunges onto the beach and then flows into the Pacific Ocean. I’ve been visiting McWay Falls inside Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park along California’s Big Sur coast for a number of years but never created an image I was satisfied so I thought I’d try again. While I created a number of images both before and during the golden light of sunset nothing was really standing out as a possible gallery image. As the day’s light continued to fade I decided to keep making images to show the movement of the water as the tide moved in and out of the small cove that the falls lives in. As the exposure increased the movement of the water became increasingly interesting and I soon realized I had the image I’d been waiting for.” He used a Mamiya M645 medium-format camera with a 55mm lens and a Manfrotto tripod and head.

I select a Photo Of The Day every day. I choose the images from the various OP galleries including AssignmentsYour Favorite Places and all of the OP Contests. Also, for each issue of the magazine I go through the Assignments galleries and choose a few to be featured in The Best Of Assignments in print and I select a weekly winner to be featured on the OP home page. To get your photos into the running all you have to do is submit them.

-Christopher Robinson, Editor
You can find me on Twitter @OPRobinson

 

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