OP – The Blog

February 17th, 2014

Photo Of The Day by Scott Rubey

Posted By Christopher Robinson
First Rays On Crater Lake by Scott Rubey

‘First Rays On Crater Lake’ by Scott Rubey

Scott Rubey made this photograph of Crater Lake after considerable research. He writes, “I had previsualized this shot several years ago, but I knew that finding a location that would convey the vastness of Crater Lake while simultaneously providing that perfect snow-covered foreground would be a challenge. After consulting maps, Sun and Moon tables, along with countless other photos, I had a rough idea of where the best winter images of the lake could be captured. From there, all I had to do was wait for ideal weather conditions. A period of high pressure on the heels of a strong winter storm provided exactly the conditions I was after. Following a seven-hour drive from Portland, I strapped on my snowshoes and hiked for several miles until arriving at the general location I knew would provide the best photographic opportunities. Once there, I scouted the rim for several hours until I found a location that provided the perfect combination of lake view, foreground and safety (stepping any closer to the edge would have provided a quick 1,000-foot drop to the lakeshore).” According to the Park Service, there was only one other back-country traveler in the entire park that night. 

Rubey used a Nikon D800, Nikon 16-35mm f/4G ED VR II AF-S IF SWM lens, Gitzo Tripod, Singh Ray split ND filter. The photo was sent to the Snow & Ice Assignment which is open until February 18th at midnight.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsYour Favorite Places and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage and several images from the Assignment Gallery are picked to be featured in The Best Of Assignments section in the print magazine. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

 

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