OP – The Blog

Posts Tagged ‘composition’

June 20th, 2016

Arranging Sea Stacks

Posted By Michael Frye
Sea stacks and cormorant, Redwood NP, CA, USA
During our recent workshop in the redwood country we had plenty of opportunities to photograph the beautiful, rugged, northern-California coast. There are many spots between Trinidad and Crescent City with offshore rocks and sea stacks, which make wonderful photographic subjects. Separating visual elements is a concern in any composition, but seems to be particularly vital when photographing the ocean and forest scenes along the northern California coast. Both sea stacks and redwood trunks need to be well-spaced, balanced, and stand out clearly.
 
March 29th, 2015

Lenses and Perspective: The Long and the Short of It

Posted By Michael Frye
Backcountry road in autumn with the San Miguel Range in the distance, Uncompahgre NF, CO, USA
Varying the focal length of your lens allows you change a composition easily without moving your feet. This is certainly convenient, and sometimes it’s essential: there may be only one suitable camera position, which means changing lenses or zooming is the only way to alter how much of the scene will be visible in your …
 
March 12th, 2015

Without Expectations, Desert Wanderings (Part 1)

Posted By Joseph Rossbach
DSC_4226
Expectations are a dangerous thing. They can lead us to great disappointment often and utter satisfaction only rarely. I often hear  and read other photographers whine and wallow over the lack of great light or weather at that location they have been chasing an image or idea for years. I often wonder how many images …
 
February 18th, 2015

3 Questions to Ask Yourself About Your Subject Before You Pull the Trigger

Posted By Jay Goodrich
Coot In Reflection by Jay Goodrich
In May of 2013, the sheer volume of images getting pushed to social media was staggering. The online photography forum Petapixel cited a 60 second video from another online community (BuzzFeed) that highlighted the numbers of what is getting published to the web every 60 seconds. It is completely overwhelming to know that 27,800 images were being …
 
August 6th, 2014

Getting Down to the Essentials

Posted By Michael Frye
Wildflower island and cascade, eastern Sierra; 100mm, 1/2 sec. at f/16, 100 ISO
It’s been an interesting summer in the Sierra. Last winter was one of the driest on record, but over the last month or so we’ve seen a steady flow of monsoonal moisture flowing up from the southeast, leading to frequent afternoon showers and thunderstorms over the higher elevations. We even heard about an epic deluge …
 
June 17th, 2014

It’s Time for a Photography Tune-Up

Posted By Jay Goodrich
Rabbit Portrait Face Eyes Texas
A FREE ebook Download Has your camera been sitting all alone in a dark closet, in a remote location of your house? Neglected. Forgotten about. Allowed to become home to multiple species of arachnids? Did winter send you back into your den for a long, dark hibernation away from the joys of picture taking? A hibernation …
 
April 3rd, 2014

Divided No More

Posted By Michael Frye
Half Dome and Yosemite Valley with fog, Yosemite NP, CA, USA
Not long ago, photographers were divided into two camps: color photographers, and black-and-white photographers. Sure, there were some people who did both, and even some who did both well, but they were rare. Most photographers specialized in one medium or the other – and I use that word deliberately, because it almost seemed like they were different mediums, not just different palettes.
 
March 6th, 2014

5 Reasons to Reject an Image

Posted By Jay Goodrich
Horses Grazing Spring Backlit Summer by Jay Goodrich
With the age of digital photography now becoming a mainstream part of society, how do you decide what photos are good to keep and what ones should be thrown in the trash? While we need reasons to reject an image, we don’t necessarily want to form a hypothesis of rules. If you ever take a workshop …
 
January 3rd, 2014

13 Favorite Images for 2013

Posted By Kevin Schafer
CD5366-02
Notice how I say “Favorites”, not necessarily the “Best.” Not only is it hard to honestly assess which are the best images in so short a time, but for me, my choice of favorites often has as much to do with the experience as the quality of the picture.
 
November 26th, 2013

What’s the Least Interesting Part of This Photograph?

Posted By Michael Frye
Moon rising between El Capitan and Cathedral Rocks from Valley View, Yosemite NP, CA, USA
The best compositions are simple; they present only the essentials, and leave out extraneous clutter. The most common mistake in photography – by far – is including too much in the frame. Anything that’s not adding to the photograph’s message is detracting from it. To help simplify your compositions, ask yourself, before you press the …