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Gain insights from professional photographers. No matter what the topic, these outdoor photography columns offer plenty of food for thought. Get tips and inspiration from the experts here.


Sunday, July 1, 2007

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon

The Painted Hills Unit is just one of three units that make up the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. This unit alone contains more than 3,000 acres of unmatched beauty, unique even to Oregon. The monument gets its name from the John Day River, the longest undammed river that flows into the Columbia. The three units together combine for a total of 14,000 acres. At John Day Fossil Beds, paleontologists have been able to find fossil remains of animals and plants dating back 40 million years. The Painted Hills Unit is located about 50 miles from Prineville, Oregon. From Prineville, travel east on US 26/Ochoco Highway for about 44 miles. Turn left onto Burnt Ranch Road for about 1.5 miles. Burnt Ranch Road becomes Bridge Creek Road. You‚’ll travel about five miles on Bridge Creek Road. Use caution when driving this gravel road and be sure to gas up and get any supplies you might need in Prineville.

Sunday, July 1, 2007

The Thin Ice Of Global Climate Change

Polar Bears International fights to save our ambassadors of the Arctic

In the past twenty years that I’ve been regularly traveling to the Arctic, I’ve learned to appreciate and respect the land, the people and the animals who live there. There’s no other place in the world with the open spaces and the bounty of life—says Norbert Rosing, member of Polar Bears International’s Photography Advisory Council.

Monday, June 25, 2007

Digital ISO

How does the ISO setting affect the results in digital capture? My objective is to create a good-quality 16x20 print. Let’s say there’s no movement of the subject involved. How would the image look at ISO 100 compared to ISO 400?


Monday, June 18, 2007

Protection In The Field

While looking at the way plastic food wrap clings to just about anything, it occurred to me that this is a great way to protect one’s camera from the rain. It’s thin enough to allow normal operation of the switches and buttons.

 

 

 


Tuesday, June 12, 2007

Panoramas And Image Perspective

Why should I take a series of pictures and go to all the trouble of splicing them together in a computer to make a panorama, when all I have to do is take the photograph with a wide-angle lens and crop the top and bottom?

 

 

 


Monday, June 4, 2007

Printing From Film In The Digital Age

As of late, I don’t seem to be getting any quality prints from my slides. I’ve tried different labs and I’m still getting poor quality. The prints aren’t even close to what I’m seeing at the light table. Colors aren’t saturated, images aren’t sharp, etc. I’m still using the same Fujichrome Velvia and my techniques haven’t changed. My labs don’t seem to give me any answers. I’m shooting digitally as well, but is it possible that, in this digital age, printing processes have changed? Do labs not want to deal with slides anymore?

Friday, June 1, 2007

Backing Up Images In The Field

You can keep your images secure without carrying two laptops on every trip

Since the dawn of the digital era, I’ve sometimes wondered whatever became of the "travel lighter" promise of filmless photography. Finally, it was said, we wouldn’t be required to lug around hundreds of rolls of film on extended trips. While it’s true that a laptop alone is lighter and less bulky than a couple of hundred rolls of 35mm film, what I didn’t realize early on was that the laptop was only one of several components I felt compelled to carry to do digital photography on the road.

Friday, June 1, 2007

My Vacation

Take a break from "serious photography" and you might get a serious photograph

From inside our tent, the incessant flapping of the tent fly told me that the spring winds were coming up today. It was still dark outside, and I was glad that we were going home and would miss out on the pending sandstorm. My family still slept and dawn was about to come. For the past three mornings, I arose to photograph the Death Valley sunrise. The trip had been fun for the family, plus I was very pleased with some new work I had made.

Friday, June 1, 2007

Candlewood Lake, Connecticut


Candlewood Lake is Connecticut’s largest lake and one of the country’s largest man-made bodies of water. Nestled in the state’s western highlands and bordered by the towns of Brookfield, Danbury, New Fairfield, New Milford and Sherman, the lake was created in 1928 when valleys were flooded to fuel a hydroelectric plant at the northeastern tip of the lake.

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