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Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Going With The Flow


DSLRs let you hone in on a subject and work it to find the single, perfect shot

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For the "Rock and Water" image here, I made around 100 frames total using six or seven shutter speeds. When editing my images from this day, I had 450 frames made at several locations. I reviewed each frame with Adobe Lightroom's Compare View tool to slowly edit down to the best expression of what I saw and felt. Each exposure had subtle differences. The larger image was made with a 1⁄2 sec. exposure, the 2005 image at 1⁄1000 sec. My point is that it takes this kind of extra effort to push one's work to the next level.

There are some people who might presume that this approach is sloppy, lazy and a "spray and pray" technique, but if used with intense focus on fast-moving and constantly changing subjects such as a waterfall, the technique can capture nuances that would be missed otherwise. I do believe in photographing with discipline and with as much intentional vision as possible. After all, for most of my career, I used a 4x5 view camera and had limited funds for film.
For the "Rock and Water" image here, I made around 100 frames total using six or seven shutter speeds. When editing my images from this day, I had 450 frames made at several locations. I reviewed each frame with Adobe Lightroom's Compare View tool to slowly edit down to the best expression of what I saw and felt.
Enjoy the luxury of digital capture as I've discussed here, but don't depend on a high volume of captures or the possibility of rescue in Photoshop as an excuse for lack of attention to the details of lighting and composition. The freedom of this approach can be educational if the results are studied carefully. It also can allow the photographer to capture thrilling moments in time, such as the "frozen" and "blurred" images shown here, that are beyond human perception.

To learn about William Neill’s his one-on-one workshops, ebooks (William Neill’s Yosemite, Meditations in Monochrome, Impressions of Light and Landscapes of the Spirit) and online courses with BetterPhoto.com, and to visit his PhotoBlog, go to www.williamneill.com.

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