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Photo Adventure

Photo Adventure

Adventure photographer Bill Hatcher travels the globe to tell compelling stories through his images.


Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Try A Photo Bike-Tour

Explore a new location by bicycle for a more intimate connection with the landscape

This issue’s column continues my discussion about adventure photography in New Zealand. My latest adventure Down Under was a bike trip across the South Island from the east coast to the town of Te Anau, gateway to Fiordland National Park on the west coast. 

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Adventure, Kiwi Style

A photography journey Down Under documenting the masters of sport

As I write this, I’ve relocated and have been living for less than a week in my new home base on the South Island of New Zealand. The coastal town of Dunedin will be base camp for the next six months. From my experience, New Zealand could very well be the mecca for adventure photography. The island’s roads and airports make it a cinch to get around, yet New Zealand offers a rugged landscape on par with some of the wildest places on earth.

Friday, August 1, 2008

What Moves You

Finding your own photo style is a journey, not a destination

To what can we look to inspire our photographic style, and what are the benefits of knowing our photographic style? As photographers, we fly, drive or hike into the world’s farthest corners to be surrounded by beautiful landscapes or a constant whirl of exotic people and events.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Assignment Vietnam

A snapshot sparks an idea

The worst season to visit southeastern Asia, specifically if you want to explore and climb northern Vietnam’s spectacular karst limestone towers, is in the middle of summer. The summer temperatures have an uncanny ability to match the daytime humidity that averages 95%. That’s unless a summer monsoon inundates the region.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Memories From Down Under

Inspired by a blast from the past

A long, long time ago, back in April 1985, a talented German rock climber by the name of Wolfgang Gllich succeeded in making the first ascent of the climb Punks in the Gym. Gllich rated the difficulty of the route the staggering grade of 32, or 5.14. The ascent occurred in the small and at the time little-known climbing area of Mount Arapiles, located in the most unlikely of locations‚ the flat, wheat-farming region of southeastern Australia. The local climbing guide reads: For awhile, Punks was the hardest route in the known universe.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Burnout

When a creative slump happens, change your visual diet

All of us have those moments in photography where we face a creative block. The subject matter that we love and have always found interesting to shoot now suddenly seems boring and uninspiring. For both the working pro as well as the weekend warrior, you can’t risk having these dry spells.

Thursday, November 1, 2007

Moving Fast And Going Slow

Technology lets us go through life at breakneck speed, but not always in the correct direction

It’s surprising how often we curse the complexity and expense of the new cameras and computers, but at the same time, demand more speed and efficiency. And this isn’t just limited to cameras and computers, but extends into every facet of our lives, including cell phones, handheld GPS, satellite phones, MP3 players, compact, high-power strobe lighting and an endless array of other electronics we now depend on when we go outdoors to shoot photos. Ten years ago, most of these devices had no part in our lives, yet today we couldn’t see doing without them. I’m not reminiscing about the good old days because I absolutely love all the new electronics. I’m not a tech wizard, but I still probably spend too much time exploring the photography applications of the newest and fastest technology. I figure I only need to know enough to operate the device—I don’t have to understand the design of its inner workings.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Grand Canyon Solo

Searching for unique photos puts our columnist in a tough spot

Damn the sheep, damn the light, I was alone and I was trapped! I was 20 feet above a deep pool, having squeezed myself behind a truck-sized capstone in an effort to climb out of a canyon narrows. Blocking my exit were several bowling ball-sized rocks, spaced like bars in a cage, sealing a way out!

Friday, December 1, 2006

Home Field Training

Mentally prepare yourself to think like a pro adventure photographer

home field trainingAt first glance, it would seem that unless you’re a full-time adventure athlete, photographing action and adventure photography is something to which you’ll have little opportunity to apply yourself. I believe that nothing could be farther from the truth. When considering the steps to shooting action photos, there are many ways you can use these ideas when practicing and honing your photographic skills far from the mountains or wild rivers.

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