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Camera Lenses Reviews and Articles


With a variety of camera lenses on the market, how do you choose the one that's best for your outdoor camera? Check out our digital camera lens reviews. From wide-angle lenses and telephoto zooms, trust advice from the experts.




Friday, April 1, 2005

Sigma 105mm ƒ/2.8 DG Macro & EF-500 DG Super Flash

This macro lens and electronic flash make a great combo for close-ups

I have a love-hate relationship with spiders. I find their webs and variation in body styles and colors to be fascinating subjects, but I don’t like walking into their webs at night, which happens too often at certain times of the year. I’d rather not have a spider crawling down my neck either! Recently, as I went outside one night to walk the dog, I pulled up short of entanglement with a head-high web barely visible in the moonlight. I noted a big spider and a striking web that promised some interesting images.

Saturday, January 1, 2005

Tamron SP AF200-500mm Di LD (IF)

Enjoy super-telephoto focal lengths at an affordable price

The Tamron SP AF200-500mm ƒ/5.6-6.3 Di LD (IF) lens is the kind of optic that excites many of us, especially if we’re shooting digitally. That’s because a focal length range that typically has been fairly costly to add to a camera bag becomes incredibly affordable with this lens. It’s also a boon when used with a digital SLR, where the magnification factor boosts the apparent focal length to 760mm.

Wednesday, December 1, 2004

Sigma 80-400mm OS Zoom

Sigma enters the image-steadying realm with its affordable OS zoom

One of the outstanding technological advancements for nature photographers has been the use of lens technology that reduces the effect of camera movement on image quality. Camera movement or "shake" during exposure is a leading cause of a lack of sharpness in photos. Now, Sigma has introduced its Optical Stabilizer, or OS, in a high-quality, APO-design, affordable telephoto zoom: the 80-400mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 EX. The lens is available in Canon, Sigma and Nikon mounts.

Wednesday, September 1, 2004

Top Lens Choices For Digital Cameras

Specially designed optics optimize your camera's performance

Digital photography hasn’t just changed our cameras; it’s changing our lenses, too. D-SLRs and advanced compacts alike now sport specialized optics tuned for the new requirements of digital image sensors. Before we get into all that new glass, though, you’ll need to know what these lenses are designed to do.

Sunday, August 1, 2004

Lenses [And The Landscape]

Film Vs. Digital | Zooms | Wide-Angles | Telephotos | Zooms Vs. Fixed

Painters have many options when creating on the canvas. They have a wide selection of brushes, oils and colors from which to choose when painting a landscape. Photographers are no different. Although we’re not choosing between types of camel-hair brushes, we’re offered a wealth of alternatives when it comes to lenses and focal lengths. What we decide on can make all the difference in the world.

Thursday, July 1, 2004

Tamron SP AF 17-35mm ƒ/2.8-4 Di

Wide-angle zoom for digital and film cameras

If you’re in the midst of a transition from film to digital imaging, you’ll soon discover that your trusty 24mm wide-angle isn’t very wide on your D-SLR. In fact, that all-encompassing 24mm now acts like a 36mm normal lens! This, you’re finding out, is due to your image sensor’s smaller size in comparison to 35mm. While this effect offers increased telephoto reach on the long end, it causes trouble for users of wide-angle lenses.

Tuesday, June 1, 2004

Tokina 17mm Wide-Angle

A high-quality super-wide-angle at a moderate price

You can get the focal length of the Tokina AT-X 17 AF Pro lens in a zoom, and sometimes in a similar focal length, so why bother with a single focal length? The answer has two parts: size and quality for the price. The Tokina 17mm ƒ/3.5 lens lists for $810 and has a street price of approximately $400. Zoom lenses that get this wide and are close to this price usually aren’t as sharp as the Tokina in the wider ƒ-stops (stopped down, modern lenses of any major manufacturer at any price are quite remarkable), don’t control flare as well, and exhibit some barrel distortion (bending of straight lines, such as horizons, when near the edge of the frame). After shooting with the AT-X Pro for a while, I found it consistently sharp throughout the ƒ-stop range, with a high degree of flare control, and straight lines stayed straight.

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