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Sunday, April 1, 2007

Small-Format Wide-Angle Zooms


You don't need a "full-frame"-sensor D-SLR to do wide-angle photography



Wide-Angle Zooms For
Smaller-Sensor D-SLRs
For Canon
Canon EF-S 10-22mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 USM
Sigma 10-20mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 EX DC
Tamron 11-18mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF)
Tokina 12-24mm ƒ/4 AT-X AF PRO DX
Tokina 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 AT-X AF DX Fish-Eye Zoom
For Fujifilm
Nikon 12-24mm ƒ/4G ED-IF AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor
Sigma 10-20mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 EX DC
Tamron 11-18mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF)
Tokina 12-24mm ƒ/4 AT-X AF PRO DX
Tokina 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 AT-X AF DX Fish-Eye Zoom
For Leica
Olympus 7-14mm ƒ/4.0 Digital Zuiko
Olympus 11-22mm ƒ/2.8-3.5 Digital Zuiko
For Nikon
Nikon 12-24mm ƒ/4G ED-IF AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor
Sigma 10-20mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 EX DC
Tamron 11-18mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF)
Tokina 12-24mm ƒ/4 AT-X AF PRO DX
Tokina 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 AT-X AF DX Fish-Eye Zoom
For Olympus
Olympus 7-14mm ƒ/4.0 Digital Zuiko
Olympus 11-22mm ƒ/2.8-3.5 Digital Zuiko
For Panasonic
Olympus 7-14mm ƒ/4.0 Digital Zuiko
Olympus 11-22mm ƒ/2.8-3.5 Digital Zuiko
For Pentax
Pentax smc-P-DA 12-24mm ƒ/4.0 ED AL (IF)
Pentax smc-P-DA 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 ED-IF Fisheye Zoom
For Samsung
Pentax smc-P-DA 12-24mm ƒ/4.0 ED AL (IF)
Pentax smc-P-DA 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 ED-IF Fisheye Zoom
For Sigma
Sigma 10-20mm ƒ/4-5.6 EX DC
For Sony
Sony SAL 11-18mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 DT
Sigma 10-20mm ƒ/4-5.6 EX DC
Tamron 11-18mm ƒ/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF)
D-SLRs That Use Smaller-Than-35mm Image Sensors
D-SLRs That Use "APS-C"-Size Image Sensors (1.5x focal-length factor)
Fujifilm
All D-SLR models
Konica Minolta
All D-SLR models
Nikon
All D-SLR models
Pentax
All D-SLR models
Samsung
All D-SLR models
Sony
DSLR-A100
D-SLRs That Use "APS-C"-Size
Image Sensors (1.6x focal-length factor)

Canon
EOS D30
EOS D60
EOS 10D
EOS 20D
EOS 30D
EOS Digital Rebel
EOS Digital Rebel XT
EOS Digital Rebel XTi
D-SLRs That Use "APS-C"-Size Image Sensors (1.7x focal-length factor)
Sigma
SD9
SD10
SD14
D-SLRs That Use "Four Thirds System" Image Sensors (2.0x focal-length factor)
Leica
Digilux 3
Olympus
All D-SLR models
Panasonic
Lumix DMC

For Those Who Think
Really Wide...

Besides the nine rectilinear ("regular") wide-angle zooms, two fisheye zooms are on the market. The Pentax smc-P-DA 10-17mm can be used with Pentax and Samsung D-SLRs; the Tokina AT-X 10-17mm DX is available in mounts for Canon, Nikon and Sony APS-format D-SLRs. These zooms provide an angle of view of 180 degrees (measured diagonally, at the 10mm setting) when used on these cameras, complete with the hallmark fish-eye barrel distortion: straight lines that don’t go right through the center of the image will be bowed out toward the frame edges.

Alphabet Soup

Lens manufacturers use a lot of different letter combinations in their lens names besides the aforementioned ones designating the APS-C-sensor optics. Here are some of significance to wide-angle photographers.

LD—Low-dispersion elements minimize chromatic aberrations and thus improve sharpness and color. They also reduce the need for additional elements, keeping lens size and weight down. Different manufacturers use different letters for their variants on the LD concept: ED, SD, SLD and S-UD are examples. All offer the same effect of sharper images with lighter lenses.

IF—Internal focusing offers several advantages. First, the front element doesn’t rotate during focusing, so orientation-sensitive lens attachments like polarizers and graduated filters stay put as you focus. Second, the physical length of the lens doesn’t change during focusing because only internal elements are moved. Thus, balance is better (this is of more concern with long lenses than wide-angles, but still nice). Finally, because smaller internal elements are moved instead of larger front ones, autofocusing can be quicker and more accurate. Rear focusing (RF) offers similar advantages

Asph—Aspherical elements reduce spherical aberrations and distortion, which means sharper images from center to edges and straighter straight lines at the edges of the image.






























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