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Wednesday, August 1, 2007

Tokina AT-X 107 DX AF 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 Fish-Eye


A creative approach to nature photography provided by this ultra-wide-angle zoom

Short Report: Tokina AT-X 107 DX AF 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 Fish-Eye




Tokina’s AT-X 107 DX AF 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 fish-eye zoom lens is the most fun I’ve had with a lens in a long while. It features an incredibly wide 180-degree field of view, and with its zoom, something unique for fish-eye lenses, it also acts effectively as a wide-angle lens (albeit with some barrel distortion).

Tokina AT-X 107 DX AF 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 Fish-EyeThe best way to visualize the "fish-eye" image you’ll get with the AT-X 107 DX AF 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 is to imagine the view you get when looking through the peephole of a door or a convex rearview mirror. The subject in the center will appear closer and larger than the rest of the image, while the lines of the background will curve into each other.

Tokina AT-X 107 DX AF 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 Fish-EyeFor practical photography, this lens has little use. For experimental photography, the possibilities are tremendous. By using a tripod and angling the AT-X 107 DX AF 10-17mm ƒ/3.5-4.5 straight up, you could take a picture of the whole sky, or a landscape that starts at your feet and ends all the way in the clouds above. (I accidentally included my feet in a few of my images, and had to learn to lean forward to get the shot I wanted.)

The corner-to-corner images are great. Though straight lines are curved, as they’re supposed to be with a fish-eye lens, there was no vignetting and no color or tonal loss along the corners of the image. The shots were sharp and clean, and the autofocus worked better than I expected it to, especially with a third-party lens purposely built for image distortion. The only problem I noticed was a slight purple bleed along the edges of backlit subjects.








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