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Friday, December 15, 2006

Late-Breaking News About Aperture 1.5.2


Aperture 1.5.2 provides performance, reliability, and compatibility enhancements.

Suppressing Preview Generation When Opening Aperture When Aperture is opened, it begins updating previews for those projects whose Maintain Previews setting is enabled. (For more information about maintaining previews, see “Controlling Previews with the Project Action Pop-Up Menu” on page 13.) This can cause problems if a project contains damaged files or images in unsupported file formats. In Aperture 1.5.2, you can suppress preview generation when opening Aperture, allowing you to more easily identify the damaged image files. To do this, press the Shift key while opening Aperture. You can also cancel the current preview maintenance operation using the Background Task List window.

Note: If you have canceled a preview maintenance operation, the previews are not updated until another change is made to the image. To force Aperture to update the preview for an image, see “Controlling Previews with Shortcut Menus” on page 14. The next time you open Aperture, automatic preview maintenance resumes.

Scaling Watermarks

Aperture 1.5.2 provides the ability to turn watermark scaling on and off. Aperture allows you to scale a watermark by the same amount as the exported image. For example, if the image is exported at 50 percent of its original size, the watermark is also scaled to 50 percent of its original size to maintain the watermark’s visual appearance in relation to the image as a whole. However, you can keep watermark scaling turned off when it’s important to maintain the size of your watermark regardless of the size of the exported image.

To export images with scaled watermarks:

1 Select the images you want to export.

2 Choose File > Export > Export Versions (or press Command-Shift-E).

3 In the dialog that appears, choose Edit from the Export Preset pop-up menu.

4 In the Export Presets dialog, select the export preset you want to use to export your images.

5 If necessary, choose an output dimension option from the Size To pop-up menu.

Note: Watermarks are never scaled above 100 percent of the size at which they were created. If an image is exported at 100 percent of its original size, the watermark is not scaled. If the watermark is too small in relation to the image as a whole, you will need to create a new watermark at a larger size.

6 Select the Show Watermark checkbox.

7 Click the Choose Image button.

8 Select the image you want to use as a watermark, then click Choose.

9 Choose where you want the watermark to appear on the images from the Position pop-up menu.

10 To adjust the opacity of the watermark, drag the Opacity slider to a new position.

11 To scale the watermark by the same amount as the images, select the “Scale watermark” checkbox.

Note: If you have already created the watermark to match the output dimensions of the exported images, you do not need to select the “Scale watermark” checkbox.

12 When you’re satisfied with how your watermark appears in the watermark preview area, click OK.

13 Navigate to the location where you want the exported images placed.

14 Choose a name format for your exported files from the Export Name Format pop-up menu.

15 Click Export. Your images are exported and the watermark is scaled by the same amount as the exported images.

For more information about exporting images and applying watermarks, see the Aperture User Manual in the Aperture Help menu.


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