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How-To

Outdoor Photography Techniques


Master the skills you need with photography techniques from the experts. Whether you're a novice seeking advice on landscape, wildlife or nature photography or a pro looking for more advanced techniques, you'll find all the information you need, here.




Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Quality Of Light

Beyond illumination, there is the mood of a photograph

Family and friends have to get used to a photographer’s definition of good shooting conditions. They’ll ask, “How’s the weather out?”, whereas a photographer will ask, “How’s the light?” One of the key components of any photograph—whether you’re working in a studio or outdoors—is the quality of light. The “feel” of the light in a photograph often can determine its visual impact.

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

There And Back Again

Returning to your favorite places gives you the chance to push the boundaries of your own photographic exploration

The question I’m asked most frequently at workshops and when talking with other photographers: Where is my favorite place to shoot photos? The intent of a question like this is to discover what’s at the core of what I like best when I look for a photo location. When I answer with a string of places, including mountains, deserts and locations around the world, this doesn’t address the question with a tidy answer.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Dust & Snow: Shooting In Extreme Conditions

From the Arctic to the Serengeti, global nature photographer Daniel J. Cox shares his tips for taking images in extreme weather conditions

The wind is howling—not sure of the speed exactly, but the weather report suggested gusts of 30 mph or more with a wind chill in the area of -50º F. Wind chill is an understatement when the ambient temperature is already -30º F. The word “chill” seems a little underhyped. It has been two hours, and I’m still kneeling in the icy snow, my kneecaps starting to feel like frozen saucers.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Breaking The Sound Barrier

Try multimedia to add more life to your images

Among the great leaps and advances with which digital photography has provided us is a whole new way of sharing our work with others. In the past, you could make prints, or if you were a professional, maybe illustrate a magazine article or a book project—pretty slim pickings.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Long-Lens Landscapes

Get a different perspective on your favorite scenic vistas by experimenting with telephoto lens compositions

Say the words “landscape photography,” and most people immediately think of wide-open spaces, majestic mountains, big skies, long views and extreme perspectives. And yet, some landscape images don’t necessarily need impressive land features or dramatic skies. In fact, they may not need sky at all. Successful compositions can be found not only on a grand scale, but also in intimate, graceful detail.

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Photoshop Lightroom 2: For Nature Photographers

The new version of the popular Adobe software melds traditional darkroom controls with the digital world

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 is an amazing program. I’ve been working with it throughout its development process, and I feel like I’m back in the world of the traditional darkroom, now for color images. Lightroom was designed to help the photographer gain more control over his or her images while maintaining an efficient and effective workflow. It’s about organizing digital images to make them more accessible, processing them quickly and then getting them to an audience through slideshows, prints or web galleries (and, of course, image files).

Friday, August 1, 2008

Where In The World?

Geotagging puts a new spin on how to track photos

Keeping track of where you photographed that last spectacular sunset or a deer roaming a mountain landscape is a challenging task. This is where GPS technology is an outdoor photographer’s best friend. While popular spots like Delicate Arch or Half Dome are well documented, when you’re venturing deeper into the wild, having a tool to mark exact locations, times and dates of when the shutter was pressed comes in handy, especially later when you’re downloading and cataloging images.

Friday, August 1, 2008

HDR For The Landscape

Take advantage of High Dynamic Range software to photograph the landscape in a more visual way

Landscape photographers have been challenged by the range of tones in real life compared to what they can capture with the camera. This was true when Ansel Adams was shooting black-and-white large-format images 60 years ago, and it’s true today for digital photographers. Sunlight and shade can be too much for even the best of sensors.

Friday, August 1, 2008

Weekend Retreats

Short workshops and seminars offer fresh ideas and a new handle on techniques, plus help photographers overcome roadblocks to success—all in a brief period of time

Weekend workshops and seminars present an opportunity for outdoor photographers to absorb and learn new skills and techniques over an intense few days. From lectures on mastering the digital print to shooting with pros in the field, there are ample opportunities to do what we love and learn something new.

Friday, August 1, 2008

Print Like Ansel Adams

Tips and techniques from one of the experts at Nash Editions will help you make your best black-and-white prints ever

As the digital march continues onward, there’s one thing that will never change: the pure aesthetic quality of elegant black-and-white imagery. My position at Nash Editions has exposed me to a wide variety of photographic art, and with that variety comes a plethora of problems. Much of my Photoshop skills are a direct result of problem solving.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Making Summer Color

In a season dominated by green, you can help the natural landscape with your camera, filters and the delicate use of Photoshop tools

In the summer, hot on the heels of a season that positively bursts with varied hues, the color that most comes to mind is green. The landscape becomes a green carpet, and finding dramatic color combinations can be a daunting task. Sure, there still are flowers and blooms to work with, but compared to the explosion of spring colors, summer photography can be tough. To make summer color really pop, you can turn to some special equipment and technology.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Unlimited Depth Of Field

A revolutionary software package redefines what’s possible for you to achieve with sharp focus in a photograph

In the digital era, advancements arrive every few months—not just in cameras, but also in the form of image-processing software programs. Some of these give us new standards for judging both photographers and their photographs. Coupled with decent equipment and capturing techniques, great image-processing programs leave no excuse for images that are less than sharp, improperly exposed, incorrectly colored or poorly framed. Now another new program, Helicon Focus, has removed the limits to depth of field in photography.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Shoot Like Ansel Adams With 35mm D-SLRs

Today’s tilt-shift lenses offer unparalleled perspective control

Ansel Adams was best known for his ultra-sharp landscapes, which he achieved through the use of a 4x5 view camera. The view camera allowed Adams to adjust the film plane and the lens plane so he could control the depth of field and the size relationships of objects in the frame with tilt and rise and fall movements. Using this technique, he was able to alter the perspective to his desire, whether he was trying to achieve perspective control through rise movements in Yosemite or increasing the depth of field by making the lens standard tilt down.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

The World Is Your Classroom

Photographic tours and workshops offer hands-on learning experiences with professional photographers in incredible and iconic locations

Attending a top photographic workshop is more than a mere vacation, it's an opportunity to immerse yourself in a new location and learn skills that will pay off again and again. Photo workshops go beyond basics like how to use your histogram, getting the right exposure or the benefits of shooting on a tripod. A workshop is a way to hone your skills through hands-on learning in some of the best locations in the world for nature photography.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Be Abstract

The flowers that bloom so profusely in the Spring give you a chance to create otherworldly images of color and shape. It's photography that's beyond the ordinary.

My exploration into the incredible beauty of abstract flower photography began at a photo workshop at Point Reyes National Seashore in California. It was a turning point in my life! Once I discovered the unlimited number of graphic designs I could create with the colors and patterns and flowing lines of a blossom—the way I could change the drama and mood by subtly changing how the light played on the petals and accented the shadows—I was hooked.

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