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How-To

Outdoor Photography Techniques


Master the skills you need with photography techniques from the experts. Whether you're a novice seeking advice on landscape, wildlife or nature photography or a pro looking for more advanced techniques, you'll find all the information you need, here.




Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Making Your Best B&W

Conversions in the computer have become easier, allowing you to get better results than ever before

Today, the choice to make a color or a black-and-white image is far different from the era of film. With film, the decision would be made when you loaded your film.

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Get Into The Stock Market

With more Outdoor Photographer readers looking to sell images in the face of an increasingly fragmented marketplace, there are some tremendous opportunities opening up

The last 10 years have been chaotic for independent photographers, as the old ways of doing business have withered before our eyes.

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

The Zone System Revisited

Ansel Adams’ system for previsualizing and controlling the tones in a photograph are every bit as relevant today as they were when he first came up with them in the middle of the 20th century

Ansel Adams is credited with developing the Zone System in the 1940s. In the ensuing time, photography has undergone a series of monumental changes, but even today when digital dominates the photography landscape, the Zone System remains relevant, particularly if you’re going to be making black-and-white photographs.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Set Up Your Camera For Best Field Use

Get the most from your camera by having it dialed in for nature photography

Have you set up your camera to make it work optimally for you? Have you changed the camera from its default settings? Most photographers make the RAW or JPEG (or both) choice, but since they’re used to film cameras, many don’t realize that there are other important settings that should be changed and adjusted from the way the camera came to you.

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Ask The Pros!

The Community section of OP on the web is an interactive area for readers, photographers and the OP editors to compare thoughts and ideas on photography, with topics like gear, wildlife, software, great photography spots and more.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Taking Flight

Miguel Lasa may be a physician by training, but he’s a top wildlife photographer by avocation

If you visit Miguel Lasa’s website, you’ll find some amazing photos of ospreys, snowy owls, bald eagles and other birds swooping and diving and battling and just generally being birds. Many pro photographers photograph birds, and do it amazingly well. But UK-based Lasa has a talent for bringing the viewer right into the middle of the action with his photos and capturing the birds’ “personalities” as well as their motions.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Photoshop Tips From The Pros

Some of the best in nature photography share 11 techniques that will turn a good photograph into an award-winner

There are many elements that separate the top nature photographers from hobbyists. With today’s digital tools, not only do photographers rely on a great eye, time-tested technique and quality equipment, but also on their ability to optimize images after capture using Photoshop and other tools.

Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Create The Old Masters Look With Modern Gear

Using the latest in software, techniques and hardware can provide you with imagery that will rival the masterpieces of nature photography

The literal trailblazers of nature photography—Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Eliot Porter, Carleton Watkins, Edward Muybridge and others—carried heavy and sensitive equipment through miles of unpaved wilderness in order to bring back photographs of the world that they saw.

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Get The Most From A Workshop

What to look for and what to expect from a photography workshop

Photo workshops can be a productive way to learn more about photography. They offer an opportunity to try new things, gain the expertise of an experienced instructor and share ideas with students who have similar backgrounds and interests. There’s a wide variety of workshops available, and it can be challenging to know exactly which workshop to take and what you can expect from the workshop. So it’s important to take a look at what you need from the experience and how you can get the most from it.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Be A Photography Rebel

10 tips to create unique and powerful images

In the age of inexpensive, high-quality digital cameras, suddenly everyone is a photographer. The digital revolution has unleashed a horde of shooters, all vying to become the next Ansel Adams. As a result, it gets tougher and tougher to stand out from the crowd. How can you break free from the pack with truly unique images?

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Web Optimization Part II

Working with sharpness, watermarks and metadata

In the January/February issue, we addressed the concepts of examining your target audience and choosing the appropriate file size and image size for the intended display. Here, we’ll look at the important steps of applying sharpness and applying watermarks and using metadata. Watermarks are an essential tool for protecting your images when you make them available on the web, and metadata is extremely useful for both image protection and for making your images searchable so people can find you on the web.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Power Cloning

Instead of wrestling with tools that only can do part of the job, try this technique to clone color while maintaining the all-important texture in your image

Photoshop provides many tools for cloning, the process of cleaning up small imperfections before printing. Dust on the sensor, contrails in the sky, twigs protruding into the frame or a cigarette butt in the scene are examples of things a photographer might choose to clone out. Several tools are provided in Photoshop to make easy work of these situations. The Rubber Stamp tool, the Patch tool, the Healing Brush and the Spot Healing Brush are the usual choices.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Geotagging

How to use technology to stay organized and track your photography

Like many photographers, I take a lot of photos and struggle with the organizational aspects of my imaging workflow. While I do my best to tag images when importing them to my PC, I typically rely on the date and my memory to find the photos I’m looking for. That was before I started using geotagging.

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Southwestern Safaris

Extraordinary wildlife photo opportunities exist on the expansive ranches of Texas and northeastern Mexico

So a wildlife photo safari to Africa or the Pantanal isn’t in your budget. Don’t put away your camera! Several ranches with spectacular wildlife diversity and facilities for photographers await in the Texas Hill Country, the Rio Grande Valley and the state of Tamaulipas in Mexico, with many animals that are almost impossible to photograph anywhere else. Don’t like crowded national parks? Besides staff, you may be the only person on the ranch. Imagine a thousand acres of wildlife habitat all to yourself!

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Legacy: Think Like Ansel Adams Today

Tools and aesthetics have changed, but the techniques of the great American landscape master still apply

The legacy of Ansel Adams is a driving creative force that motivates every outdoor photographer. Through his treks to Yosemite Valley and other American landscapes, Adams almost single-handedly created modern nature photography. We know many readers will be ready to list all of the other great early American nature photographers and, to be sure, there were many, but none has the same legacy, the same enduring visual magnetism, as the work of Ansel Adams.

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