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Outdoor Photography Techniques


Master the skills you need with photography techniques from the experts. Whether you're a novice seeking advice on landscape, wildlife or nature photography or a pro looking for more advanced techniques, you'll find all the information you need, here.




Tuesday, May 1, 2007

The Sky Solution

Using Photoshop to repair problem skies when the light is too contrasty for your film or sensor to record properly

One of the great challenges I find with photography is the inability to capture the full range of tones and colors I see in a scene. My camera just isn’t capable of doing that. This Photoshop technique allows you to repair an image that didn’t record the original scene correctly, turning a throwaway shot into a photo suitable for framing.

Sunday, April 1, 2007

Digital Exposure Essentials

Getting the exposure right is at least as important when shooting digital as when shooting film

In order to have a proper exposure, how much light needs to hit the image sensor of your camera when you press the shutter release? This is the basic question of exposure, and two factors determine the answer: ƒ-stop and shutter speed. You can let the camera choose these for you or choose them yourself in one of your camera’s manual modes. Either way, the amount of natural light at your location must first be measured—and measured accurately.

Sunday, April 1, 2007

Wings Of Spring

Try these 10 tips from renowned professional Tom Vezo and get your best avian images this spring

A bald eagle skims the surface of its own reflection as it hunts for fish along the coast of Alaska. An Atlantic Coast black skimmer gingerly plucks its offspring in its maw to carry it to a safer place. A Rufous hummingbird gleams iridescent as it sips at nectar in a field of blush rose. These are images from Tom Vezo’s latest award-winning book, Wings of Spring: Courtship, Nesting and Fledging, a collection of intimate photographs of the lives, behavior and beauty of these birds.

Sunday, April 1, 2007

Essentials

Think about the core elements that make up all landscape photographs

What are the essential ingredients for a great landscape photograph? While in the process of developing an online landscape course, I’ve been asking myself this question in order to help photographers improve their work. There’s an obvious list of elements that make up any strong photograph:


Sunday, April 1, 2007

Get A Move On

Use these techniques to add a feeling of motion to your images

As a visual storyteller, I sometimes look at my video-shooting colleagues with more than a little envy. They carry only one camera (albeit a big one) with one zoom lens of incredible range and speed; they not only capture sound, but seem to be able to shoot in pitch-dark conditions as well; and most enviable of all, they can record movement and the passage of time.

Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Digital Exposure Basics:

Understanding Shutter Speeds And ƒ-stops. Here are some tips to help you get consistently good exposure

Let’s begin with shutter speed. Shutter speed is the time the shutter, which lets light onto the digital image sensor, remains open—or the time the image sensor is activated. If you’re new to photography, look at it this way. If you’re in a room and open and lower a window shade, you’re basically doing the same thing a shutter does: letting light expose an area. The longer you leave the shade up, the longer the room is illuminated.

Thursday, March 1, 2007

Rain Forest Digital

You can successfully photograph in wet conditions with digital gear

The rain forests of Central America beckon to photographers in so many ways. Popular books, such as Rainforest by Thomas Marent, show off the amazing colors, the unusual forms and shapes, and the exotic attraction of the area. For a very long time, I really wanted to visit a rain forest and photograph there.

Thursday, March 1, 2007

B&W In The Digital Age

Talented artists are always eager to embrace new technology if it has the potential to enrich their art and bring forth their vision. If he had access to today's tools, what would Ansel Adams do?

More than 20 years since his passing, Ansel Adams is probably still the most widely known black-and-white outdoor photographer. He didn’t shoot digitally because digital imaging as we know it didn’t exist in those days. But I think the legendary black-and-white master would be quite interested in digital imaging were he in his shooting prime today.



Thursday, March 1, 2007

Finding Nirvana In The Mountains

Your best images come when you see the photograph as a whole

Why do people climb dangerous mountains, and why are people so obsessed with the quest for adventure? These are common questions among people who don’t climb mountains. And for that matter, I’m also asked about what pushes me to pursue adventure photography. Couldn’t I have opted for any number of less dangerous photo careers?

Monday, January 1, 2007

The Complete Guide To Working With A Lab

Photo labs aren't just for film shooters, by a long shot

How things have changed. As a new photographer many multitudes of moons ago, I developed my own film and made my own prints, in large part because I couldn’t afford to have a good lab do it. Today, in the digital age, it actually costs less to use a good lab—and the quality is excellent.

Monday, January 1, 2007

The Myth Of Protective Underexposure

Hamlet's new D-SLR dilemma: to underexpose or not to underexpose?

I know you’ve heard this or something like it: "I always underexpose my digital files. I want to be sure my highlights are protected, so underexposure, for me, is like insurance for the highlights. Anyway, I shoot RAW, so it really doesn’t matter if my image is underexposed."

Monday, January 1, 2007

10 Creative Winter Jump Starts

Keep your photographic eye sharp by exploring the winter world

The old saying in Minnesota is that we have nine months of winter and three months of tough sledding. While this is a bit of an exaggeration, it often starts to seem that way to photographers waiting for spring wildflowers and lush green scenics.

Monday, January 1, 2007

Common Digital Problems & Their Solutions

Make digital work for you with these easy-to-use tips that solve typical challenges faced in the digital darkroom

Isn’t it about time you make digital work for you? Let’s face it, there are so many pressures to consider today, from buying the "perfect" camera to using Photoshop the "right" way. There are a number of common digital challenges that I’ve seen in magazine submissions, contests and workshops—challenges that affect nearly everyone, from pro to amateur, working digitally. Get a handle on them and make digital work for you with the solutions outlined here.

Friday, December 1, 2006

Form & Function

A retrospective exhibit explores the influence of Eliot Porter on Robert Ketchum's work—and Ketchum's departure from it.

When Eliot Porter set aside his microscope and picked up a view camera, leaving behind his biochemical research at Harvard University to pursue photography full time, he couldn’t possibly have known the impact his work as a photographer would make. Porter not only inspired generations of color photographers, but also helped fuel an environmental movement responding to a growing awareness of the effects of industrialization on the landscape.

Friday, December 1, 2006

Travel And The Photographer

Use preparation and common sense to negotiate today's heightened security concerns

Today’s environment of heightened security and stretched tensions can make travel with photo gear more challenging. Since the regulations of various countries, airlines and border crossings are diverse and dynamic, my recommendations are guidelines only. That being said, two things will put you in good standing no matter where you travel: use a combination of common sense and courtesy, and do your homework.

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