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More How-To

More Photo How-To Articles


Discover the wide range of photography techniques and how-tos in this varied selection of articles. You'll find tips on photography gear and travel, plus shooting techniques and solutions to common problems.


Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Online Learning Comes Of Age

Much more than the correspondence courses of a past era, you can build upon your photo education by taking a class through the Internet

The old-fashioned correspondence course has grown up, and in the digital age, it has become a viable and truly enjoyable way to learn how to take better pictures.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

The Big Trip

See how National Geographic photographer and Outdoor Photographer columnist Frans Lanting gears up for an expedition. You probably won’t ever need as much equipment with you, but there’s a lot to learn from his approach.

What gear to pack? What to leave at home? If you don’t have it, you can’t use it, balanced with the fact that too much equipment can slow you down and you miss the opportunity to put yourself in a position to get the shot in the first place.

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Get Into The Stock Market

With more Outdoor Photographer readers looking to sell images in the face of an increasingly fragmented marketplace, there are some tremendous opportunities opening up

The last 10 years have been chaotic for independent photographers, as the old ways of doing business have withered before our eyes.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Web Optimization Part II

Working with sharpness, watermarks and metadata

In the January/February issue, we addressed the concepts of examining your target audience and choosing the appropriate file size and image size for the intended display. Here, we’ll look at the important steps of applying sharpness and applying watermarks and using metadata. Watermarks are an essential tool for protecting your images when you make them available on the web, and metadata is extremely useful for both image protection and for making your images searchable so people can find you on the web.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Geotagging

How to use technology to stay organized and track your photography

Like many photographers, I take a lot of photos and struggle with the organizational aspects of my imaging workflow. While I do my best to tag images when importing them to my PC, I typically rely on the date and my memory to find the photos I’m looking for. That was before I started using geotagging.

Tuesday, October 21, 2008

Sound Practices III: Putting It All Together

Assembling your multimedia into a cohesive, finished project

In my previous two columns, I talked about the techniques and gear for gathering sound, and some of the software for editing sound.

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Sound Practices II

More sounds for your images

In this, the second installment of “Adventures in Multimedia,” I’ll discuss some basics about gathering and editing sound. Last issue, I covered choosing and using a digital sound recorder, whether it’s one of the dedicated units like the Olympus LS-10 or Zoom H2, or even your iPod with one of the optional recording microphone attachments that are becoming ever more popular.

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

There And Back Again

Returning to your favorite places gives you the chance to push the boundaries of your own photographic exploration

The question I’m asked most frequently at workshops and when talking with other photographers: Where is my favorite place to shoot photos? The intent of a question like this is to discover what’s at the core of what I like best when I look for a photo location. When I answer with a string of places, including mountains, deserts and locations around the world, this doesn’t address the question with a tidy answer.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Breaking The Sound Barrier

Try multimedia to add more life to your images

Among the great leaps and advances with which digital photography has provided us is a whole new way of sharing our work with others. In the past, you could make prints, or if you were a professional, maybe illustrate a magazine article or a book project—pretty slim pickings.

Friday, August 1, 2008

Weekend Retreats

Short workshops and seminars offer fresh ideas and a new handle on techniques, plus help photographers overcome roadblocks to success—all in a brief period of time

Weekend workshops and seminars present an opportunity for outdoor photographers to absorb and learn new skills and techniques over an intense few days. From lectures on mastering the digital print to shooting with pros in the field, there are ample opportunities to do what we love and learn something new.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

The World Is Your Classroom

Photographic tours and workshops offer hands-on learning experiences with professional photographers in incredible and iconic locations

Attending a top photographic workshop is more than a mere vacation, it's an opportunity to immerse yourself in a new location and learn skills that will pay off again and again. Photo workshops go beyond basics like how to use your histogram, getting the right exposure or the benefits of shooting on a tripod. A workshop is a way to hone your skills through hands-on learning in some of the best locations in the world for nature photography.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Spring In New England

As the weather warms, the Northeast offers some of its most dramatic and colorful vistas

The Green Mountains are thickly forested and crisscrossed with a myriad of hiking trails, backcountry dirt roads and rushing streams to explore. In spring, I enjoy venturing into the woods, searching for compositions that feature the rich greens of spring that seem to peak from the middle of May to mid-June.


Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Indecent Exposures (And How To Avoid Them)

Don't let a bright or dark background sneak in and ruin your exposure!

While the multi-segment metering systems built into today’s D-SLR cameras provide excellent exposures in an amazingly wide range of situations, there are some scenes that can fool them. Learning to recognize and compensate for those situations will make you a better photographer.

Saturday, March 1, 2008

Live View, Hype Or Benefit?

D-SLRs now can see what the lens sees directly at the sensor rather than only through the viewfinder

When digital cameras entered the market, Sony had one of the first cameras with a rotating lens assembly, so you could see the LCD at different angles compared to the way the lens could see the world. I shot with it up high, down low, and I loved not being restricted to shooting right at my eye level. I could actually see what the lens was seeing when the camera was on the ground without lying on the ground myself.

Saturday, March 1, 2008

Spring Trail Tips

Don't forget the basics!

As spring arrives, so do fresh photo ops, and some of the best are in places you can’t reach by vehicle. Hiking in wild places can lead you to lots of terrific wildlife and landscapes, but also to some hazards.

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