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Monday, November 28, 2011

Combine Two Or More If The Action Doesn’t Unfold


How to use Photoshop to create an illustrative wildlife image, by combining two or more files into a single photo.

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Wildlife photography is a challenge. It requires lots of patience, dedication, trips to the animals and time. But quite often, no matter how much time you spend, how patient you are, how many trips you take, and how dedicated you are, the animals don't cooperate. The light wasn't right, the animals never showed up, they appeared but displayed little behavior, their head angles were wrong, etc. This is where image processing can rescue you from your dilemma of not getting “the shot” no matter how hard you tried.

I use Photoshop to create an illustrative wildlife image to combine two or more files into a single photo. I use the word illustrative in that I don't want to give the wrong impression that the photo was made as a single capture. This is where digital processing gets a bad reputation unless the maker of the photo comes clean. For the sake of those who want to maintain the integrity of every photographer, if you do create composites, please don't to pass them off as single captures.


In the illustrative image I composited for this How To, I used the same bird from two frames, but because of the way he positioned himself in each, it gives the impression that one is chasing another. In actuality, the bird that was doing the chasing didn't cooperate, and I completely left him out.

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