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Get back to nature with Outdoor Photographer. From landscape photography articles that include the rugged beauty of the West to the bustle of the urban jungle, use our nature and wildlife photo essays to find your next adventure.


Sunday, June 1, 2008

Kenya

Top outfitters share safari planning tips to help you focus on the best opportunities for the trip of a lifetime

With good reason, early settlers and subsequent big-game hunters found present-day Kenya to be the best environment in East Africa. Straddling the equator with generally high elevations, this land enjoys pleasant temperatures and climate for most of the year. Vast grass plains and numerous rivers feed and water great populations of wildlife and birds. Travel magazines continually try to promote the new and undiscovered, but in the case of Kenya, the best is still the best.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Assignment Vietnam

A snapshot sparks an idea

The worst season to visit southeastern Asia, specifically if you want to explore and climb northern Vietnam’s spectacular karst limestone towers, is in the middle of summer. The summer temperatures have an uncanny ability to match the daytime humidity that averages 95%. That’s unless a summer monsoon inundates the region.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Changing With The Times

How a landscape photographer reinvented himself for the digital era

A lot can change in 30 years—just ask landscape photographer Carr Clifton. He has endured a turbulent stock-photography marketplace and revolutionized work flow to find himself, creatively speaking, right back where he began. As a newbie photographer in the early 1970s, Clifton simply wanted to photograph beautiful places. Today that same desire pushes him a little farther into the great outdoors.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Wyoming Hot Spots For Spring And Fall

Photographer Frederic Joy reveals some magnificent spots across Wyoming, a state dominated by mountain ranges and high-altitude plains

Frederic Joy loves Wyoming as much for the freedom of its wide-open spaces as for its spectacular mountains and wildlife. The state’s diversity includes a number of bold mountain ranges such as the Tetons, the Wind Rivers, the Absarokas and the Big Horns. These ranges alternate between high sagebrush plains and high desert, giving way to the prairie grasslands in the eastern part of the state.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

In The Clouds

A threatened cloud forest in Mexico is the focus of an innovative, new concept in conservation photography

Ancient Mayan and Aztec cultures worshiped the Resplendent Quetzal as a deity. To harm the bird would result in the death penalty. One of the last remaining refuges of this endangered species is a cloud forest in El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, which straddles the Sierra Madre Mountains in the southern state of Chiapas, Mexico.

Tuesday, April 1, 2008

Port Lavaca, Texas

Port Lavaca is located near the center of the 275-mile Gulf Coast region between Galveston and Corpus Christi, just south of Victoria, Texas. Port Lavaca and Calhoun County are surrounded by Lavaca and Matagorda Bay on the east, San Antonio Bay on the west, and Espiritu Santo Bay in the South

Tuesday, April 1, 2008

A Matter Of Perspective

Frans Lanting takes to the skies to give a different look to Canyonlands

Frans Lanting is best known for his work documenting the world’s environmental issues, but the photographer recognized for his wildlife photography showcases his skill with landscapes in two recent assignments photographing Canyonlands from the ground and from the air.

Tuesday, April 1, 2008

A View From The Swamp

Clyde Butcher wades into the Florida wetlands to do more than just capture the view

Out in the Florida woods, standing waist-deep in swamp water, is where Clyde Butcher takes pictures. Alongside crocodiles, gators and poisonous snakes, he waits patiently with his 8x10 Deardorff view camera ready for the moment when an image comes together. The celebrated landscape photographer has spent more than 35 years capturing untouched places while exploring his own relationship with nature.


Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Mid-Atlantic Wild!

From lawyer to naturalist, Ian Plant is now living the dream

To reach Smith Island, Maryland, from the mainland, nature photographer Ian Plant must navigate a kayak across the Chesapeake Bay for eight miles. While calm seas and blue skies yield an uneventful and rather rapid crossing, it also means a lackluster opportunity for powerful photography. He sets up camp on a remote beach and waits for something better in the morning.


Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Devil Canyon Overlook, Bighorn Canyon NRA, Wyoming

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area is a little-known gem located in northern Wyoming and extending through the southern border of Montana. It was established in 1966 after construction of the Yellowtail Dam, which transformed the previously almost impassible Bighorn River into a lake that runs 71 miles south through majestic Bighorn Canyon. The south entrance is located about 10 miles northeast of Lovell, Wyoming, on Highway 37, which is the only road that services the canyon on the south side. Several campgrounds are open year-round.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

China South

Enticing new opportunities for the cultural photographer are becoming more accessible in these less traveled regions of abundant diversity

With the mega-event of the Summer Olympics coming to Beijing this year, a great deal of focus will be on China’s showcase cities as engines of modernization and commerce. Overlooked may be the incredible geography and ethnic diversity, stretching from the 15,000-foot mountains of Yunnan to the karst formations, clustered villages and rice terraces of Guizhou. These two southern Chinese provinces are populated by a range of colorful ethnic groups perhaps equaled nowhere else in
the world.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

A Prairie Photo Companion

One Colorado photographer takes aim at the plains in a new photo conservation book

Scenes of the famed Rocky Mountains epitomize the Colorado landscape. Jagged, snowcapped peaks in winter, yellow aspen trees in fall, blooming wildflowers in spring and yearlong wildlife sightings make for the kind of iconic shots that fill photography bookshelves. But one photographer has turned his attention elsewhere in the state. Trading steep, rocky terrain for flat grasslands, Dave Showalter captures the essence of Colorado’s eastern plains in his book Prairie Thunder: The Nature of Colorado’s Great Plains. More than an attempt to show the subtle beauty of a region where few rarely spend time, Showalter joined forces with an army of scientists, conservation groups and private landowners to complete the project. In doing so, his work has become part of a major effort to protect the Colorado grasslands.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Memories From Down Under

Inspired by a blast from the past

A long, long time ago, back in April 1985, a talented German rock climber by the name of Wolfgang Gllich succeeded in making the first ascent of the climb Punks in the Gym. Gllich rated the difficulty of the route the staggering grade of 32, or 5.14. The ascent occurred in the small and at the time little-known climbing area of Mount Arapiles, located in the most unlikely of locations‚ the flat, wheat-farming region of southeastern Australia. The local climbing guide reads: For awhile, Punks was the hardest route in the known universe.

Saturday, March 1, 2008

The Arrowhead Region Of Minnesota

The Minnesota "Arrowhead" starts at Duluth and stretches north to the Canadian border. The southern edge of the region follows the north shore of Lake Superior, much of it part of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). The remainder of the region is part of the Superior National Forest, established by Theodore Roosevelt in 1909. The Arrowhead offers spectacular views of the cliffs of the north shore, beautiful vistas across broad valleys and many rivers and waterfalls that tumble toward Superior.

Saturday, March 1, 2008

Mountain Trek

Take a road trip through the Rockies and the Smokies with two pros who map the most dramatic spots in these American icons

The Rocky Mountains and the Smoky Mountains are two of the most dramatic ranges in North America, where one can capture a fusion of geologic and scenic images. The Rockies run for 3,000 miles from British Columbia, Canada, to the lower portion of New Mexico. Straddling Tennessee and North Carolina, the Smokies are a smaller chain of mountains named for the haze that engulfs them most of the year.


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