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Get back to nature with Outdoor Photographer. From landscape photography articles that include the rugged beauty of the West to the bustle of the urban jungle, use our nature and wildlife photo essays to find your next adventure.


Wednesday, October 1, 2008

The Challenges Of Yellowstone

Salvatore Vasapolli gets off the beaten path, works around the crowds and shoots in fast-changing light. He shares some secrets from his 20 years of photographing this jewel of the American park system.

Salvatore Vasapolli has a long list of photographs in his stock library, but one place that continually has inspired him for more than 20 years is Yellowstone National Park. The reason is simple, he says: It’s unlike any other place on earth.

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Lake Martin Rookery, Louisiana

Located within the Cypress Island Preserve near Lafayette, La., the Lake Martin Rookery is a bird-watcher’s paradise. The lake offers a unique habitat that attracts nearly 60 percent of all U.S. bird species to a scenic forest of oak, cypress and tupelo trees.

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

There And Back Again

Returning to your favorite places gives you the chance to push the boundaries of your own photographic exploration

The question I’m asked most frequently at workshops and when talking with other photographers: Where is my favorite place to shoot photos? The intent of a question like this is to discover what’s at the core of what I like best when I look for a photo location. When I answer with a string of places, including mountains, deserts and locations around the world, this doesn’t address the question with a tidy answer.

Monday, September 1, 2008

The Timeless Nature Of New England

The rolling forest-covered hills and dramatic coastline keep a local photographer energized and shooting in this iconic region of North America

New Hampshire professional photographer William H. Johnson has photographed rural and coastal New England during all four seasons for more than 25 years. Johnson uses natural lighting and weather to capture the mood and spirit of New England, from mountains, lakes and beaches to villages, covered bridges and lighthouses. “In New England, there’s a stunning picture somewhere all the time,” says Johnson. “It’s my job to go find it.”

Monday, September 1, 2008

Old World Charm

Fine-art photographer Ben Ham merges the best of a film-based process with the best of a digital process to create the quiet beauty of his nature images

Ben Ham makes his way over a craggy landscape wielding a huge bellowed camera and an equally impressive tripod. He’s looking for just the right angle that makes the difference between art and documentation. It’s a scenario that could be from 1888.

Monday, September 1, 2008

The Morton Arboretum Lisle, Illinois

The Morton Arboretum is an outdoor museum of woody plants established in 1922 by Morton Salt magnate, Joy Morton. Situated on the rolling Valparaiso Moraine in northern Illinois and bisected by the DuPage River, the grounds encompass 1,700 acres of magnificent natural systems. There’s a restored 100-acre prairie, oak and black walnut woodlands, savannas, winding streams, lakes and marshes—and all of it is accessible on nine miles of paved one-way roads and 14 miles of hiking trails.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Coral Reefs In Peril

For all of their natural beauty and rich biological diversity, the Earth's coral reefs face an uncertain future

Healthy coral reefs are disappearing. In the fall of 2006, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force met in the Virgin Islands, where researchers issued a warning that 30 percent of the world’s coral reef population had died in the last 50 years. Another 30 percent has suffered severe damage, and 60 percent could die in less than 25 years because of pollution and global warming.

Friday, August 1, 2008

Devils Garden, Utah

In 1996, 1.7 million acres of southern Utah between Zion National Park and Capitol Reef National Park were designated as the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, a sprawling area encompassing some of the most spectacular landscape in Utah.

Friday, August 1, 2008

A New Look At The Landscape

Reimagining the traditional landscape image

The Outdoor Photographer 2008 Landscape Annual features the work of three artists who each takes a somewhat different look at landscape photography. Rodney Lough, Shane McDermott and Sean Bagshaw are all widely recognized photographers who have made their mark by taking steps away from the more staid, traditional landscape scene. Their work differs in both look and approach. While Lough shoots with an 8x10 view camera, both McDermott and Bagshaw are digital shooters, and it’s interesting to note that McDermott has never been a film shooter.

Friday, August 1, 2008

National Parks Northern Style

Canada has some of North America’s most spectacular landscapes and thousands of square miles of protected vistas

Even before Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon were established as national parks, their marvelous landscapes attracted photographers with an undiminished magnetism. When I began my photography career back in 1980, I soon realized that my home in the mountains of northern Utah provided me with an ideal location.

Friday, August 1, 2008

From News To Nature

A landscape great turns his eye on the Grand Canyon

First, Jack Dykinga won the Pulitzer Prize, and then he found his calling. As a young photographer in the 1960s and ’70s, he used the gritty streets of Chicago as his background to photograph the news. Trading skyscrapers for the wide-open desert, Dykinga has become one of the most respected landscape photographers working today.

Friday, August 1, 2008

What Moves You

Finding your own photo style is a journey, not a destination

To what can we look to inspire our photographic style, and what are the benefits of knowing our photographic style? As photographers, we fly, drive or hike into the world’s farthest corners to be surrounded by beautiful landscapes or a constant whirl of exotic people and events.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

The land between three waters

Many nature photographers disparage the Midwest’s lack of scenery. What they’re missing is an untouched wilderness that stretches along miles of Great Lakes coastline—the U.P., Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Nowhere in the United States will you find an area that more reflects the dramatic seasonal changes of beautiful winters, colorful falls and blooming springs through a changing landscape that offers more to the photographer than prairies, woods and wildflowers.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Pearsoney Falls, Oregon

Plunging more than 20 feet from the forest above, Pearsoney Falls is one of many breathtaking waterfalls tucked away in the Southern Oregon Cascades. Named after two families who were among the first pioneers in the area, the Pearsons and the Mahoneys, Pearsoney Falls is accessed by a short trail near the historic town of Prospect, 40 miles north of Medford.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

A Photojournalist’s Eye

From the Pacific Northwest and beyond, top nature photographer Gary Braasch takes on the planet

With those three words always top of mind, photojournalist Gary Braasch embarked on a career where environmental issues and conservation have remained the heart and soul of his work for more than 25 years. From threats to coral reefs in the Philippines to the endangered wetlands in Argentina and all points in between, his powerful photographs tell a compelling story about the state of the world’s most imperiled places.

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