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Landscape Photography Locations


Get back to nature with Outdoor Photographer. From landscape photography articles that include the rugged beauty of the West to the bustle of the urban jungle, use our nature and wildlife photo essays to find your next adventure.


Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Sugarcreek Metropark, Ohio

Sugarcreek MetroPark is located near the town of Bellbrook, 13 miles southeast of Dayton in southwestern Ohio. This family-friendly nature preserve is part of the Five Rivers MetroParks system of the Greater Dayton area. It surrounds a long stretch of scenic Sugar Creek and consists of several miles of easy to moderately difficult hiking trails along the creek and through the wooded hillsides. Specific trails lead to park features like the Three Sisters (a group of 550-year-old giant oak trees), the Osage Orange Tunnel, Sycamore Ridge, a stand of beechwoods and a tall-grass prairie.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Whiteout

A new book shows how the planet's changing climate is affecting life in the Arctic

Six years after first traveling to the Arctic Circle, nature photographer Mireille de la Lez and author Fredrik Granath have created a stunning visual record showing what the earth’s changing environment means in this part of the world. In 130 large-format, color photographs, Vanishing World: The Endangered Arctic (Abrams Books, 2007) is as much a celebration of the landscape and wildlife living in this dramatic setting as it is a firsthand account of global warming.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Sentinels Of The High Country

Seeking out the bristlecone pine in the rarified air of the mountain Southwest, David Muench finds both spiritual pilgrimage and everlasting challenge

Anchored to the steep, rocky flanks of a peak in California’s White Mountains stands a bristlecone pine so utterly exposed to the extreme climate and withering winds, it seems incredible that it ever germinated, much less matured. That this tortuously wrought living entity endured the extremes of nature’s fury for more than 4,800 years is downright miraculous.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Burnout

When a creative slump happens, change your visual diet

All of us have those moments in photography where we face a creative block. The subject matter that we love and have always found interesting to shoot now suddenly seems boring and uninspiring. For both the working pro as well as the weekend warrior, you can’t risk having these dry spells.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

Denny Creek Area, Central Cascades, Washington

The Cascade Mountains of Washington State form a north-south backbone extending from the Canadian border in the north to the Columbia River in the south. An hour’s drive from the Seattle area brings one to the first of many access points into the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, a 360,000-acre preserve of mountain streams, alpine lakes, deep evergreen forests and snow-covered peaks. Fifty miles from the Seattle-Tacoma region on Interstate 90, you’ll find the Denny Creek area, with a well-maintained five-mile trail that follows streams and lush mountain meadows to Melakwa Lake. Another trailhead nearby leads to Granite Mountain and more alpine and subalpine lakes.

Saturday, December 1, 2007

Impressions of Light

Using the capabilities of a digital camera and embracing a desire to experiment, William Neill is producing a body of unique images that go far beyond literal landscapes

I’ve been a photographer for 35 years. I started out with my first camera in 1974, a 35mm Pentax Spotmatic. I most often photographed natural patterns and other details in the landscape. In 1982, I acquired a 4x5 field camera, and for the next 20 years, I photographed mostly with 4x5 transparency film. I continued to concentrate on photographing landscape details, as well as broad views and dramatic light.

Thursday, November 1, 2007

The Mendenhall Glacier, Alaska

The Mendenhall Glacier is one of the many glaciers flowing off of the majestic Juneau Ice Field—a dramatic, 1,500-square-mile expanse of glaciated ice and rugged mountain peaks located in the southeastern panhandle of Alaska. A well-established visitor’s center is just 13 road miles from downtown Juneau, and it shouldn’t be missed. Built in 1962 on a prominent rock outcropping, it’s an outstanding interpretation center for glacier dynamics and history, and it provides excellent photo opportunities of the terminus of the glacier.


Thursday, November 1, 2007

Telling A Story With Pictures

Montana-based photographer Gordon Wiltsie is one of the world‚’s foremost expedition photographers, having recorded the exploits of many great explorers, including Alex Lowe, Conrad Anker, Will Steger, Jon Krakauer, David Breashears and Norman Vaugh

After four decades of work on assignments that have ranged from climbs in the Himalayas to treks across the frozen Arctic Ocean, Gordon Wiltsie has released To the Ends of the Earth: Adventures of an Expedition Photographer (W.W. Norton). The book is an amazing page-turner of adventure stories and images taken on many great assignments.

Thursday, November 1, 2007

Moving Fast And Going Slow

Technology lets us go through life at breakneck speed, but not always in the correct direction

It’s surprising how often we curse the complexity and expense of the new cameras and computers, but at the same time, demand more speed and efficiency. And this isn’t just limited to cameras and computers, but extends into every facet of our lives, including cell phones, handheld GPS, satellite phones, MP3 players, compact, high-power strobe lighting and an endless array of other electronics we now depend on when we go outdoors to shoot photos. Ten years ago, most of these devices had no part in our lives, yet today we couldn’t see doing without them. I’m not reminiscing about the good old days because I absolutely love all the new electronics. I’m not a tech wizard, but I still probably spend too much time exploring the photography applications of the newest and fastest technology. I figure I only need to know enough to operate the device—I don’t have to understand the design of its inner workings.

Monday, October 1, 2007

Harriman State Park, New York

Established in 1900, Harriman State Park is the second-largest state park in New York, spanning over 46,000 acres of forested mountainous terrain, with meadows, numerous lakes, bogs and streams in the scenic Hudson Highlands region of Rockland and Orange counties. It’s an easy 30-mile drive north of New York City via the Palisades Interstate Parkway, N.Y. Thruway or U.S. Route 17, or it can be accessed by Metro-North trains to Tuxedo Park. The park adjoins the popular Bear Mountain State Park and is near the West Point Military Academy.

Monday, October 1, 2007

Jungle Photography

The rain forests of Central America are so close, yet so exotic

According to Webster’s, a jungle is "an impenetrable thicket or tangled mass of tropical vegetation." Many of the rain forests of Central America fit this definition, and unless you possess superhuman strength, you won’t be able to hack through such vegetation with a machete like they did in those old "B" movies. (It looked good, though, didn’t it?)

Monday, October 1, 2007

The Wild Life

Heather Angel got her start as a biologist photographing whales and has become one of the leading nature photographers of the past quarter-century, communicating her enthusiasm for the natural world through her writing, workshops and lectures

British photographer Heather Angel has been one of the most influential nature photographers for the past 25 years. Known throughout the world for her ability to supply world-class wildlife photography of almost any animal one can think of, Angel also has taught generations about her craft through writing, lectures and workshops, including the annual Nikon and Kew Gardens photo workshops, plus many books about photography. She holds an honorary doctorate from Bath University and a special professorship position at Nottingham University. Yet rather than rest on her long list of laurels, Angel, now in her 60s, roams the world with state-of-the-art digital equipment. OP was able to catch up with her as she was wrapping up an assignment in China.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Canyoneering

Slot canyons are among the Southwest's most iconic photographic subjects, but they require proper preparation and attention to the potential hazards

When I began to turn my photographic efforts toward capturing landscape images of the American West 17 years ago, it seemed as if there was no virgin territory left. At first, I felt obliged to search out those iconic photographic overlooks from the Grand Canyon to the Grand Tetons, but I soon became frustrated as I found myself jockeying for position at even the most remote backcountry locations with hordes of other photographers. As I ventured farther and farther off the beaten path in search of new places, I began to discover locations in the West where I had the opportunity to create images where no photographer had previously deployed a tripod.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Saint Mary Lake & Wild Goose Island, Glacier National Park, Montana

Saint Mary Lake and Wild Goose Island are located in Glacier National Park, known as the "Crown Jewel" of the National Park System and named for the glacial rivers of ice that carved its spectacular landscape. The park sits astride the Continental Divide in Montana’s northern Rockies. Glacier is unique among U.S. parks, as it shares a border with Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Grand Canyon Solo

Searching for unique photos puts our columnist in a tough spot

Damn the sheep, damn the light, I was alone and I was trapped! I was 20 feet above a deep pool, having squeezed myself behind a truck-sized capstone in an effort to climb out of a canyon narrows. Blocking my exit were several bowling ball-sized rocks, spaced like bars in a cage, sealing a way out!

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