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Get back to nature with Outdoor Photographer. From landscape photography articles that include the rugged beauty of the West to the bustle of the urban jungle, use our nature and wildlife photo essays to find your next adventure.


Monday, October 1, 2007

Jungle Photography

The rain forests of Central America are so close, yet so exotic

According to Webster’s, a jungle is "an impenetrable thicket or tangled mass of tropical vegetation." Many of the rain forests of Central America fit this definition, and unless you possess superhuman strength, you won’t be able to hack through such vegetation with a machete like they did in those old "B" movies. (It looked good, though, didn’t it?)

Monday, October 1, 2007

The Wild Life

Heather Angel got her start as a biologist photographing whales and has become one of the leading nature photographers of the past quarter-century, communicating her enthusiasm for the natural world through her writing, workshops and lectures

British photographer Heather Angel has been one of the most influential nature photographers for the past 25 years. Known throughout the world for her ability to supply world-class wildlife photography of almost any animal one can think of, Angel also has taught generations about her craft through writing, lectures and workshops, including the annual Nikon and Kew Gardens photo workshops, plus many books about photography. She holds an honorary doctorate from Bath University and a special professorship position at Nottingham University. Yet rather than rest on her long list of laurels, Angel, now in her 60s, roams the world with state-of-the-art digital equipment. OP was able to catch up with her as she was wrapping up an assignment in China.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Canyoneering

Slot canyons are among the Southwest's most iconic photographic subjects, but they require proper preparation and attention to the potential hazards

When I began to turn my photographic efforts toward capturing landscape images of the American West 17 years ago, it seemed as if there was no virgin territory left. At first, I felt obliged to search out those iconic photographic overlooks from the Grand Canyon to the Grand Tetons, but I soon became frustrated as I found myself jockeying for position at even the most remote backcountry locations with hordes of other photographers. As I ventured farther and farther off the beaten path in search of new places, I began to discover locations in the West where I had the opportunity to create images where no photographer had previously deployed a tripod.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Saint Mary Lake & Wild Goose Island, Glacier National Park, Montana

Saint Mary Lake and Wild Goose Island are located in Glacier National Park, known as the "Crown Jewel" of the National Park System and named for the glacial rivers of ice that carved its spectacular landscape. The park sits astride the Continental Divide in Montana’s northern Rockies. Glacier is unique among U.S. parks, as it shares a border with Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Grand Canyon Solo

Searching for unique photos puts our columnist in a tough spot

Damn the sheep, damn the light, I was alone and I was trapped! I was 20 feet above a deep pool, having squeezed myself behind a truck-sized capstone in an effort to climb out of a canyon narrows. Blocking my exit were several bowling ball-sized rocks, spaced like bars in a cage, sealing a way out!

Wednesday, August 1, 2007

Delta Mountains, Alaska

A five-hour drive north of Anchorage, Alaska, brings you to the eastern section of the Alaska Range and the beautiful Delta Mountains, where jagged peaks, splintered glaciers, boreal forests, turquoise lakes and milky rivers can be found. The Delta Mountains are the most accessible mountains in the range and are surrounded by three of Alaska’s main highways—the Glenn, the Richardson and the Alaska.

Sunday, July 1, 2007

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon

The Painted Hills Unit is just one of three units that make up the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. This unit alone contains more than 3,000 acres of unmatched beauty, unique even to Oregon. The monument gets its name from the John Day River, the longest undammed river that flows into the Columbia. The three units together combine for a total of 14,000 acres. At John Day Fossil Beds, paleontologists have been able to find fossil remains of animals and plants dating back 40 million years. The Painted Hills Unit is located about 50 miles from Prineville, Oregon. From Prineville, travel east on US 26/Ochoco Highway for about 44 miles. Turn left onto Burnt Ranch Road for about 1.5 miles. Burnt Ranch Road becomes Bridge Creek Road. You‚’ll travel about five miles on Bridge Creek Road. Use caution when driving this gravel road and be sure to gas up and get any supplies you might need in Prineville.

Sunday, July 1, 2007

Travels To The Edge

Art Wolfe takes to HD television to visually show off the beauty and wonder of our planet

What’s the next best thing to being on the road with an internationally acclaimed photographer? Perhaps traveling along with him or her to exotic locations via the magic of high-definition television. For years, Seattle-based photographer Art Wolfe has shared his eye and knowledge with others through workshops and books. Now he’s reaching out to a larger audience through a new television series,Travels to the Edge with Art Wolfe.

Friday, June 1, 2007

Candlewood Lake, Connecticut


Candlewood Lake is Connecticut’s largest lake and one of the country’s largest man-made bodies of water. Nestled in the state’s western highlands and bordered by the towns of Brookfield, Danbury, New Fairfield, New Milford and Sherman, the lake was created in 1928 when valleys were flooded to fuel a hydroelectric plant at the northeastern tip of the lake.

Friday, June 1, 2007

Off The Beaten Path

With a passion for adventure and exploration, this photographer shows off the wild parts of the world to document the relationship between people and wildlife and the environment

There’s off the beaten path, and then there’s really off the beaten path. That’s where you’ll often find Colorado-based photographer Beth Wald. The winner of the 2006 Rowell Award for the Art of Adventure and numerous other accolades brings back images of remote areas of the globe, ranging from Afghanistan to the Arctic. Conservation of our resources—both human and geophysical—is at the heart of her work. While she began her career shooting mostly sports-adventure photography, especially climbing, now she focuses on people and places that are outside of the traditional news media’s vision.

Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Far Northern Exposure

The rugged mountains, sweeping vistas and sublime auroras are among the subjects waiting for your lens in Canada

Photographing in the Far North during the summer is a great advantage because of the extended amount of time you get to spend with that long shadow-casting, low-hanging, sweet, warm light at sunrise and sunset. Mid-August to early September is my favorite time. Autumn colors start early there, mosquitoes and black flies will be on a serious decline, weather is generally more moderate, and the sun can hang near that horizon for an hour or more before finally setting. But that’s not all—the sun can then underlight any lingering clouds and turn the sky crimson for another 15 to 20 minutes of magic. Wait, there’s more! Because the nights start to get darker this time of year, chances for seeing and photographing the Northern Lights greatly increase. Sweet!

Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Black River Wildlife Management Area, New Jersey


The Black River Wildlife Management Area (WMA), located in the township of Chester, is 12 miles west of Morristown and about one hour’s drive from New York City. This beautiful area, more than 3,000 acres in size, is easily accessible from routes 80, 206 and 513.

Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Convincing Images

National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore believes photography can make a difference in helping protect the environment

Imagine a dream National Geographic assignment: photographing America’s Gulf Coast from the tip of Florida to Brownsville, Texas. Who could resist traveling the coastline and capturing stunning images of sunsets and coastal beaches? But what Joel Sartore saw on his second assignment for the magazine turned out to be much more than pretty pictures for a national publication. He walked along debris-strewn beaches near Galveston. Recalls Sartore, "I saw dead dolphins and garbage that included medical waste and plastic bottles from around the world."

Sunday, April 1, 2007

Great Falls National Park, Virginia

Great Falls National Park is a natural jewel situated just 14 miles northwest of our nation’s capitol. The park is part of the George Washington Memorial Parkway and covers some 900 acres on the Virginia side of the falls. On the Maryland side is the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Parkland, which stretches for 184 miles from D.C. to West Virginia. Both sides offer excellent vantage points with easy access, including wheelchair, to the falls by way of level paths and overlooks. The falls have a total vertical drop of some 76 feet in less than a mile and are comprised of several major cascades, the largest of which is 33 feet. The Potomac here is rated as a class 5 whitewater, which is considered a serious risk, and an average of seven people die every year in its powerful grip.

Sunday, April 1, 2007

Mountain Digital

Elizabeth Carmel's expressive landscapes are a combination of subtle details and majestic scenes

A summer day starts early in the high Sierras for photographer Elizabeth Carmel. Arriving at the trailhead in total darkness, she straps on her backpack, and for the next hour, with only a headlamp illuminating the path, she treks up a meandering mountain trail.

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