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International Adventure & Travel Photography


These travel photo essays will transport you to the far reaches of the globe. View images from around the world and learn about the landscapes and cultures experienced by other adventure photographers.


Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Chasing Dolphins Down The Amazon

National Geographic photographer Kevin Schafer takes a wild underwater adventure with a rare pod of cetaceans in South America

Let me be clear: I’m not a scuba diver. Although I’ve happily snorkeled all my life, I’ve always shied away from “serious” diving. This begs the question: How does a nondiver end up shooting an underwater story for National Geographic?

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

A Journey To India

OP columnist William Neill’s recent trek on the subcontinent is the story of modern adventure travel

Traveling to foreign locations is cause for great excitement for most photographers, as it is for me each time I visit the colorful country of India.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

The Faces Of Peru

More than just the iconic Machu Picchu, Peru is a wealth of landscape, wildlife and cultural photographic opportunities

I’m perched precariously on a ledge looking over stone ruins 30 feet below when the winds and the rains suddenly let up, sun shafts penetrating the clearing clouds, and somebody gives me a strong shove from behind.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Time For Elephants

A Kenyan resident for nearly 30 years, Karl Ammann has enjoyed a long association with elephants combined with an unparalleled knowledge of the game parks. A wealth of images is the by-product.

Time always has been the most overlooked or underexposed factor in wildlife photography. So much is made out of capturing the peak action or the decisive moment that little lip service is given to the all-important hours of planning, waiting and observing.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

The Quest For Tigers

Delving into India’s wilder side, expedition leaders Susi Allison-Lama and Butch Lama give their perspective from the field on where to find and photograph the Royal Bengal tiger

Their deep, rumbling roars echo through the verdant jungles where they hunt. Massive predatory machines that stalk silently and strike ferociously, they sit at the top of the complex food chain as dominant apex predators keeping the ecosystem in balance. For generations, tigers have captured the allure and imagination of people. Like all of the big cats, however, these magnificent predators are facing an uncertain future. With ever-shrinking habitat and the need to venture further afield to find their prey, the pressures on the world’s tiger populations could become too much for the animals to bear.

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Caught In The Act

An unprecedented experiment in time-lapse photography reveals how quickly glaciers are melting around the world

On glaciers across the northern hemisphere, a couple dozen solar-powered cameras are shooting once an hour for every daylight hour, capturing the ice as it melts in real time. This is a phenomenon often discussed but rarely seen, and perhaps never before in this way. When culled together, these hour-to-hour frames compose dramatic time-lapse image sequences showing that glaciers everywhere are disappearing fast.

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Ladakh, India

Bound by two of the world’s highest mountain ranges, the Himalaya to the south and the Karakoram to the north, Ladakh is located in the far northern reaches of India, sitting on the western edge of the Tibetan Plateau at an average altitude of 10,000 feet under crystal-clear skies of the purest azure. The landscape is stark, yet incredibly striking, its dun-colored hills dramatically adorned with whitewashed Buddhist monasteries, many of them ancient.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

On The Edge

Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge series on public television has brought the intrepid nature photographer to some of the most rare and exotic places and cultures in the world

I began exploring the world as a kid in West Seattle, mounting expeditions into the woods behind my parents’ house.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

The Ocean & The Desert

There are some surprising similarities for photographers who shoot in these disparate environments

At first glance, there appears to be little in common between the open sea and the desert—wet, salty and always in motion versus dry, dusty and slow to change.

Tuesday, November 4, 2008

Concepts Of Nature

Andy Rouse is among the top wildlife photographers in the world. His new book takes readers into his overall thinking and approach to photography.

Award-winning British photographer Andy Rouse discusses his approach to photography in his recent book Concepts of Nature: A Wildlife Photographer’s Art.

Saturday, November 1, 2008

African Connections

Sebastião Salgado is one of the true living legends of photography. His latest book, Africa, examines the continent in a way that only Salgado’s provocative imagery can.

Sebastião Salgado’s book, Africa (Taschen), pays homage to Africa’s people, wildlife and landscape. It’s a magnificent collection of images culled from more than three decades of the Brazilian-born, Paris-based photographer’s work on the continent.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Coral Reefs In Peril

For all of their natural beauty and rich biological diversity, the Earth's coral reefs face an uncertain future

Healthy coral reefs are disappearing. In the fall of 2006, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force met in the Virgin Islands, where researchers issued a warning that 30 percent of the world’s coral reef population had died in the last 50 years. Another 30 percent has suffered severe damage, and 60 percent could die in less than 25 years because of pollution and global warming.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

A Photojournalist’s Eye

From the Pacific Northwest and beyond, top nature photographer Gary Braasch takes on the planet

With those three words always top of mind, photojournalist Gary Braasch embarked on a career where environmental issues and conservation have remained the heart and soul of his work for more than 25 years. From threats to coral reefs in the Philippines to the endangered wetlands in Argentina and all points in between, his powerful photographs tell a compelling story about the state of the world’s most imperiled places.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Kenya

Top outfitters share safari planning tips to help you focus on the best opportunities for the trip of a lifetime

With good reason, early settlers and subsequent big-game hunters found present-day Kenya to be the best environment in East Africa. Straddling the equator with generally high elevations, this land enjoys pleasant temperatures and climate for most of the year. Vast grass plains and numerous rivers feed and water great populations of wildlife and birds. Travel magazines continually try to promote the new and undiscovered, but in the case of Kenya, the best is still the best.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

In The Clouds

A threatened cloud forest in Mexico is the focus of an innovative, new concept in conservation photography

Ancient Mayan and Aztec cultures worshiped the Resplendent Quetzal as a deity. To harm the bird would result in the death penalty. One of the last remaining refuges of this endangered species is a cloud forest in El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, which straddles the Sierra Madre Mountains in the southern state of Chiapas, Mexico.

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