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International Adventure & Travel Photography


These travel photo essays will transport you to the far reaches of the globe. View images from around the world and learn about the landscapes and cultures experienced by other adventure photographers.


Tuesday, December 2, 2008

On The Edge

Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge series on public television has brought the intrepid nature photographer to some of the most rare and exotic places and cultures in the world

I began exploring the world as a kid in West Seattle, mounting expeditions into the woods behind my parents’ house.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

The Ocean & The Desert

There are some surprising similarities for photographers who shoot in these disparate environments

At first glance, there appears to be little in common between the open sea and the desert—wet, salty and always in motion versus dry, dusty and slow to change.

Tuesday, November 4, 2008

Concepts Of Nature

Andy Rouse is among the top wildlife photographers in the world. His new book takes readers into his overall thinking and approach to photography.

Award-winning British photographer Andy Rouse discusses his approach to photography in his recent book Concepts of Nature: A Wildlife Photographer’s Art.

Saturday, November 1, 2008

African Connections

Sebastião Salgado is one of the true living legends of photography. His latest book, Africa, examines the continent in a way that only Salgado’s provocative imagery can.

Sebastião Salgado’s book, Africa (Taschen), pays homage to Africa’s people, wildlife and landscape. It’s a magnificent collection of images culled from more than three decades of the Brazilian-born, Paris-based photographer’s work on the continent.

Monday, September 1, 2008

Coral Reefs In Peril

For all of their natural beauty and rich biological diversity, the Earth's coral reefs face an uncertain future

Healthy coral reefs are disappearing. In the fall of 2006, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force met in the Virgin Islands, where researchers issued a warning that 30 percent of the world’s coral reef population had died in the last 50 years. Another 30 percent has suffered severe damage, and 60 percent could die in less than 25 years because of pollution and global warming.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

A Photojournalist’s Eye

From the Pacific Northwest and beyond, top nature photographer Gary Braasch takes on the planet

With those three words always top of mind, photojournalist Gary Braasch embarked on a career where environmental issues and conservation have remained the heart and soul of his work for more than 25 years. From threats to coral reefs in the Philippines to the endangered wetlands in Argentina and all points in between, his powerful photographs tell a compelling story about the state of the world’s most imperiled places.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Kenya

Top outfitters share safari planning tips to help you focus on the best opportunities for the trip of a lifetime

With good reason, early settlers and subsequent big-game hunters found present-day Kenya to be the best environment in East Africa. Straddling the equator with generally high elevations, this land enjoys pleasant temperatures and climate for most of the year. Vast grass plains and numerous rivers feed and water great populations of wildlife and birds. Travel magazines continually try to promote the new and undiscovered, but in the case of Kenya, the best is still the best.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

In The Clouds

A threatened cloud forest in Mexico is the focus of an innovative, new concept in conservation photography

Ancient Mayan and Aztec cultures worshiped the Resplendent Quetzal as a deity. To harm the bird would result in the death penalty. One of the last remaining refuges of this endangered species is a cloud forest in El Triunfo Biosphere Reserve, which straddles the Sierra Madre Mountains in the southern state of Chiapas, Mexico.

Tuesday, January 1, 2008

Whiteout

A new book shows how the planet's changing climate is affecting life in the Arctic

Six years after first traveling to the Arctic Circle, nature photographer Mireille de la Lez and author Fredrik Granath have created a stunning visual record showing what the earth’s changing environment means in this part of the world. In 130 large-format, color photographs, Vanishing World: The Endangered Arctic (Abrams Books, 2007) is as much a celebration of the landscape and wildlife living in this dramatic setting as it is a firsthand account of global warming.

Thursday, November 1, 2007

Telling A Story With Pictures

Montana-based photographer Gordon Wiltsie is one of the world‚’s foremost expedition photographers, having recorded the exploits of many great explorers, including Alex Lowe, Conrad Anker, Will Steger, Jon Krakauer, David Breashears and Norman Vaugh

After four decades of work on assignments that have ranged from climbs in the Himalayas to treks across the frozen Arctic Ocean, Gordon Wiltsie has released To the Ends of the Earth: Adventures of an Expedition Photographer (W.W. Norton). The book is an amazing page-turner of adventure stories and images taken on many great assignments.

Monday, October 1, 2007

Jungle Photography

The rain forests of Central America are so close, yet so exotic

According to Webster’s, a jungle is "an impenetrable thicket or tangled mass of tropical vegetation." Many of the rain forests of Central America fit this definition, and unless you possess superhuman strength, you won’t be able to hack through such vegetation with a machete like they did in those old "B" movies. (It looked good, though, didn’t it?)

Sunday, July 1, 2007

Travels To The Edge

Art Wolfe takes to HD television to visually show off the beauty and wonder of our planet

What’s the next best thing to being on the road with an internationally acclaimed photographer? Perhaps traveling along with him or her to exotic locations via the magic of high-definition television. For years, Seattle-based photographer Art Wolfe has shared his eye and knowledge with others through workshops and books. Now he’s reaching out to a larger audience through a new television series,Travels to the Edge with Art Wolfe.

Friday, December 1, 2006

The Seven Sisters

Northeastern India is home to a rich palette of culture, wildlife and color

the seven sistersIndia’s enduring cultures, ancient architecture and stunning landscapes have drawn photographers since the infancy of photography more than 150 years ago. The vibrancy of color, the diversity of wildlife and the beauty of its people have held a special allure to those who not only enjoy traveling to distant locales, but who also hope to experience and make photographs of places whose history is measured not in hundreds, but thousands of years.

Sunday, January 1, 2006

India Live And In Color

The vibrant world of this cultural jewel is revealed through an amateur's lens

It can be said that until you’ve photographed in India, you’ve only seen the world in black-and-white. Colors, rich and saturated, are everywhere. You see them in the orange sari worn by the woman selling mangos and other fruits on the street, in the wall whose red paint explodes with energy when struck by the late-afternoon sun, and in the stones and intricate sculptures of Hindu temples that rise high into a clear blue sky. Color is everywhere, and for anyone who loves to create images, India seems like a photographic heaven.

Friday, April 1, 2005

Land Of Passes

The Tibetan-like land of Ladakh makes a last stand against the rush of globalization, leaving it as the do-or-die destination for photographers seeking an unblemished Buddhist culture in a Himalayan-scale landscape.

The Western world, clothed in the coarse wool and hemp garments of the Middle Ages, was instantly seduced by the mystical fabric of the East, as though the gossamer threads were spun from the golden hair of angels. And so it followed that numerous caravan trails were pioneered to traverse the vast deserts and mighty mountains of central Asia. Collectively, the many disparate routes came to be known as the Silk Road. This trade in oriental luxury lent its name to the larger exchange of necessities that not only moved east and west, but north and south.

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