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North American Wildlife & Landscape Photography


The stunning beauty of North American landscapes and wildlife awaits you. Explore Red Rock Canyon State Park in California or feast your eyes on abundant wildlife in Alaska. Our American photography features can turn your next journey into a visually stunning experience.


Friday, August 1, 2008

From News To Nature

A landscape great turns his eye on the Grand Canyon

First, Jack Dykinga won the Pulitzer Prize, and then he found his calling. As a young photographer in the 1960s and ’70s, he used the gritty streets of Chicago as his background to photograph the news. Trading skyscrapers for the wide-open desert, Dykinga has become one of the most respected landscape photographers working today.

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

The land between three waters

Many nature photographers disparage the Midwest’s lack of scenery. What they’re missing is an untouched wilderness that stretches along miles of Great Lakes coastline—the U.P., Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Nowhere in the United States will you find an area that more reflects the dramatic seasonal changes of beautiful winters, colorful falls and blooming springs through a changing landscape that offers more to the photographer than prairies, woods and wildflowers.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Legacy

Half a century of photography, half a hundred exhibit books and still going strong—David Muench has a new book of the work that has made him a world treasure

Resting on the dust jacket, inviting you in, is a sublime, graphical image of a huge window in solid rock. Through the sailboat-shaped opening in the massive sandstone wall, earth's old friend the moon rides full and crisp through a rich magenta wash of middusk sky. Higher up, scarlet hues ease into cool vermillion.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Changing With The Times

How a landscape photographer reinvented himself for the digital era

A lot can change in 30 years—just ask landscape photographer Carr Clifton. He has endured a turbulent stock-photography marketplace and revolutionized work flow to find himself, creatively speaking, right back where he began. As a newbie photographer in the early 1970s, Clifton simply wanted to photograph beautiful places. Today that same desire pushes him a little farther into the great outdoors.

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Wyoming Hot Spots For Spring And Fall

Photographer Frederic Joy reveals some magnificent spots across Wyoming, a state dominated by mountain ranges and high-altitude plains

Frederic Joy loves Wyoming as much for the freedom of its wide-open spaces as for its spectacular mountains and wildlife. The state’s diversity includes a number of bold mountain ranges such as the Tetons, the Wind Rivers, the Absarokas and the Big Horns. These ranges alternate between high sagebrush plains and high desert, giving way to the prairie grasslands in the eastern part of the state.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Mid-Atlantic Wild!

From lawyer to naturalist, Ian Plant is now living the dream

To reach Smith Island, Maryland, from the mainland, nature photographer Ian Plant must navigate a kayak across the Chesapeake Bay for eight miles. While calm seas and blue skies yield an uneventful and rather rapid crossing, it also means a lackluster opportunity for powerful photography. He sets up camp on a remote beach and waits for something better in the morning.


Saturday, March 1, 2008

Mountain Trek

Take a road trip through the Rockies and the Smokies with two pros who map the most dramatic spots in these American icons

The Rocky Mountains and the Smoky Mountains are two of the most dramatic ranges in North America, where one can capture a fusion of geologic and scenic images. The Rockies run for 3,000 miles from British Columbia, Canada, to the lower portion of New Mexico. Straddling Tennessee and North Carolina, the Smokies are a smaller chain of mountains named for the haze that engulfs them most of the year.


Tuesday, January 1, 2008

The Last Frontier

Grizzly bears, old-growth rain forest and state-sized glaciers are just a few of the photo opportunities in Alaska‚’s Chugach Mountains

Looking out the window of the small, red Super Cub, Alaska’s two-person version of an air taxi, I’m awed at the jagged, snowy peaks rising out of the dense, temperate rain forest. There are no roads, buildings or signs of humans—just mile after mile of thick green forest, turquoise lakes, alpine meadows and crevasse-laced glaciers. Having guided wilderness trips for years around the globe, I’m struggling to remember a location to match the raw beauty below. This pristine landscape consists of some of the most rugged mountains anywhere. Known as the Chugach Mountains, this Alaskan wilderness is an outdoor photographer’s paradise.

Saturday, September 1, 2007

Canyoneering

Slot canyons are among the Southwest's most iconic photographic subjects, but they require proper preparation and attention to the potential hazards

When I began to turn my photographic efforts toward capturing landscape images of the American West 17 years ago, it seemed as if there was no virgin territory left. At first, I felt obliged to search out those iconic photographic overlooks from the Grand Canyon to the Grand Tetons, but I soon became frustrated as I found myself jockeying for position at even the most remote backcountry locations with hordes of other photographers. As I ventured farther and farther off the beaten path in search of new places, I began to discover locations in the West where I had the opportunity to create images where no photographer had previously deployed a tripod.

Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Far Northern Exposure

The rugged mountains, sweeping vistas and sublime auroras are among the subjects waiting for your lens in Canada

Photographing in the Far North during the summer is a great advantage because of the extended amount of time you get to spend with that long shadow-casting, low-hanging, sweet, warm light at sunrise and sunset. Mid-August to early September is my favorite time. Autumn colors start early there, mosquitoes and black flies will be on a serious decline, weather is generally more moderate, and the sun can hang near that horizon for an hour or more before finally setting. But that’s not all—the sun can then underlight any lingering clouds and turn the sky crimson for another 15 to 20 minutes of magic. Wait, there’s more! Because the nights start to get darker this time of year, chances for seeing and photographing the Northern Lights greatly increase. Sweet!

Thursday, March 1, 2007

Your Favorite Places-2006

A look at some of our readers' favorite places around the U.S.

In 2006, we launched the Your Favorite Places section of the OP website. We invited you, our readers, to submit photographs of your favorite spots to photograph, then the editors of Outdoor Photographer would select the best images and post them in a gallery. Within a few weeks, Your Favorite Places became one of the most visited areas of the website, and the editors were overwhelmed with submissions. In fact, we were so impressed with the photographs and the variety of locations that were being submitted, we decided to put together an article in the magazine showcasing some of our favorites. We hope you’ll be inspired to submit your own images as well. It’s easy. Go to www.outdoorphotographer.com and click on the Your Favorite Places tab.

Monday, January 1, 2007

Planning For Spring

Discover the diverse photo opportunities in the southern Appalachians

Ranging from northern West Virginia to northern Georgia, the southern Appalachian Mountains have a biodiversity without rival. Combine this with rugged beauty and easy accessibility, and exploring the gifts of spring in these ancient mountains can become a consuming passion. Most areas set aside for recreational use are smaller than those found in the Southwest, but this just means it’s easier to explore more than one area. You won’t be too far from civilization but far enough to feel like Daniel Boone is looking over your shoulder.

Monday, January 1, 2007

Alaska Adventure

For intrepid photographers, Alaska is still the gold standard for untamed landscape and wildlife photography

Alaska is often referred to as the last great wilderness for nature photographers who want to see the big game of North America. Africa’s Serengeti and the Alaskan frontier are in the same class when it comes to the diversity of wildlife and the vast regions of unspoiled habitat that support these animals. Like Africa, it’s not easy to reach North America’s ultimate wilderness, but if you want to see the splendid flora and fauna this special place has to offer, the trek is well worth it. From bald eagles to caribou to whales, every aspect of the landscape offers its own treasure trove of wildlife.

Sunday, October 1, 2006

Lone Star Hotspots

Discover the American landscape, Texas-style

Diversity is the textbook definition of Texas. The Lone Star State offers a menagerie of faces that define a natural heritage known to photographers throughout the world. From the palette of color in the flora and mountains along the historical Rio Grande River to the oceanic sky over the undulating grasslands and canyons of big ranch country, Texas offers a variety of locations, subjects and seasons to fit your photographic needs.

Sunday, October 1, 2006

Isolating Fall Scenics

Discover the forest for the trees using these

The Appalachian Mountains have always served as a source of inspiration for me. Born and raised in the remote recesses of southern West Virginia, these ancient mountains became my mentors as I explored their steep slopes, narrow ridges and constricted valleys. Once I became smitten with nature photography, the Appalachians became my favorite location to explore through a viewfinder.


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