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December 2005


How-To

  • 16-Bit Challenges


    When do you really need the 16-bit capabilities of RAW files?



    More isn’t always better, but sometimes it helps. More strokes in a golf game is a bad thing, while more runs is good for baseball (unless you’re on the losing side). More heat is great for baking bread, but awful for storing eggs.

Gear

  • 2005 Holiday Book Guide



    It’s the most wonderful time of the year and, with so many good books being published and winter vacations approaching, we think it’s quite the season for book reading, too. If you’d like to lay off the eggnog and candied yams and indulge your senses in something with a little more sustenance and a lot less fat, there’s quite an array of books from which to choose.
  • Epson Stylus Photo R2400


    Impressive black-and-white prints are within your grasp



    This past summer, some friends of mine bought a new condo in Southern California, although they must have promised their first born to the mortgage company with prices the way they are. The condo was a sizable step up from their rental apartment, and in addition to a lot more square footage of floor space, it has a lot more wall space than the former residence (along with a second full bath and a balcony). Suddenly, the collection of wall art that had filled the old place barely made a dent on the walls at the new one. I should have suspected there were ulterior motives when I found myself invited over for a big dinner (with plenty of good wine). Somewhere between grilled salmon and crème brûlée, the innocent question was posed, "So, Chris, do you have any prints of your photographs you could give us for the walls?" I don’t sell them, so why not give them away?

  • Gadget Bag: Wireless Tools For The Outdoor Photographer


    New technologies cut the cables and give us expanded creative options



    Although photography is my medium of choice, I’ve always admired the simplicity of the painter’s toolbox. Canvas, brushes and paint—it doesn’t get less complicated.
  • Tokina 100mm f/2.8 Macro


    Put some distance between you and your macro subject



    Close-ups are my favorite part of nature photography. I say that not because I love bugs more than waterfowl or flower parts more than rocky landscapes. I love close-ups because they can connect me with nature anywhere, anytime. I can shoot close-ups of spiders building webs outside my backdoor or of orchids in Peru, of flowering weeds outside of my office or lichens on the rocks of Arches National Park. With close-up gear, I’m good to go whenever I want, wherever I am. I was excited to get a sample of Tokina’s new 100mm ƒ/2.8 macro lens (officially named the AT-X M100 AF Pro D). At 2.9x3.7 inches and 19 ounces, this compact lens offers film and full-frame digital cameras 1:1 at 12 inches. For small-format digital SLRs, you get an equivalent of 150-160mm (still at the fast ƒ/2.8) and more distance to 1:1. The lens includes a newly engineered multi-coating to minimize reflections when using a digital camera’s sensor (which has a shiny protective surface).
  • What's New With Zooms


    The latest in lens technology



    Lugging around a weighty pack loaded with equipment isn’t the ideal way to experience nature, and hiking long treks with it on your back or shoulders can lead to injury. You don’t want to leave gear behind, but you definitely don’t want to risk ruining the day or your health with a cumbersome load. I’ve limited my equipment to include only the necessities, and zoom lenses have become an essential part of my gear.

Locations

  • Winter Hot And Cold Spots


    Whether you've packed snowshoes or swimsuits, these diverse destinations will satisfy your craving for winter photography



    While spring and fall offer a distinctive color palette, winter brings to the prepared eye a wonderful array of tones and subjects that distinguishes it from the rest of the days of the year. Winter has a special quality all its own, which calls to the photographer to visit, to explore and to capture. With the help of several accomplished photographers, we offer some special locations to consider visiting during this time of year.

Columns

  • Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah


    Cedar Breaks National Monument is loosely sandwiched between two southwestern Utah national parks—Zion and Bryce Canyon. It towers 2,000 and 4,000 feet above these parks, respectively. The monument lies 22 miles west of Cedar City, Utah, about 60 miles east of Bryce Canyon, and about 80 miles north of Zion.

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