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December 2009


How-To

  • 10 Tips For Top Sharpness


    Getting your sharpest photographs today is as much about processing as it is about shooting technique. We’ll show you some pro tips for making your best pictures.


    Nature photographers are always on the quest for sharp pictures. I know I am. I want to be sure that when something should be sharp in a photograph, it’s indeed sharp.
  • 2009 Holiday Book Guide


    The annual OP selection of photography books for outdoor enthusiasts



    Refresh your coffee-table book collection this holiday season with some of the latest photography titles to hit bookstores.
  • Into The Caves Of Patagonia


    New camera technology comes to the rescue when one of the world’s pristine wonders is photographed


    A few days before, we had left our home in Colorado in the midst of a winter storm, our visions of sunshine, wildflowers and this lake calling us 7,000 miles south. Months previously, our friends, the landscape photographer Linde Waidhofer and her poet/graphic designer husband Lito Tejada-Flores, had shown us Linde’s haunting photographs of a group of marble caves accessible only from Lago General Carrera.
  • Old West Color


    David Stoecklein brings a timeless cowboy allure to his photography by combining classic aesthetics with his own unique style


    There’s an old cowboy adage that goes, “Talk less and say more,” and David Stoecklein does just that. Based out of Idaho, he has photographed amazingly iconic images of the American West for more than 20 years. Astoundingly, whether it’s of a modern cowboy or an expansive Southwestern landscape, his photographic style is instantly recognizable and remarkably consistent.
  • Shooting Macro? Try Flash!


    Try this dual-flash setup for complete control over the illumination in your image



    Most nature photographers spend the majority of their time shooting the very large in the natural world—big mountains, big animals. We become obsessed with the grandeur of outdoor photography.

Gear

  • Canon EOS-1D Mark IV


    Canon’s fastest D-SLR gets more megapixels, HD video, ISOs to 102,400 and more



    It has been 2½ years since Canon introduced the EOS-1D Mark III, a 10.1-megapixel, 10 fps model that proved popular with bird photographers, in particular, and with wildlife and even general nature shooters for its excellent image quality and quick performance.
  • In Focus: December 2009


    Editors' Picks


    If you’re a fan of Lensbaby’s special-effects lenses, the Lensbaby Optic Kit gives you three more creative ways of expanding your photography. The kit consists of three optics: Plastic, Pinhole/Zone plate and Single Glass.
  • Next-Gen Photo Printers


    Despite the proliferation of photo-sharing sites online, the print remains the ultimate expression of a photograph. New printer technology and models will have your prints looking better than ever.



    Printing is about sharing. Prints are tacked to the wall for all to see or given outright for others to treasure. Making prints at home heightens the pleasure of sharing your images with others.
  • Nikon D3S


    The D3S is Nikon’s latest FX-format (full-frame) D-SLR. It adds 720p HD video capability and an almost unbelievable maximum ISO of 102,400.



    Nikon’s newest top-level professional camera, the D3S was launched on October 14. The camera features a newly designed, 12.1-megapixel CMOS sensor that has a standard ISO range of 200 to 12,800, which allows you to capture low-light images that would have been all but impossible before.
  • The DSLRs Of 2009


    Despite the slow economy, nature photographers were treated to more than a dozen new high-tech D-SLRs this year. We’ve compiled a selection of the models that you’re sure to want to know more about.



    The year 2009 was a banner one for D-SLRs, with 17 models introduced by six manufacturers.

Locations

  • America's Natural Treasures


    A new book pays tribute to the national parks


    American historian, writer and conservationist Wallace Stegner once called the national parks “the best idea we ever had.” While that description may be debatable, there’s something to the notion that these beautiful natural landscapes are to the United States what the Roman Coliseum, Greece’s Parthenon or countless medieval cathedrals are to Europe.
  • Canyon Wilderness


    Jon Ortner is based about as far from the landscapes that make up his latest book as you can imagine, and he shows that sometimes the best landscapes come from having an outsider’s perspective


    Jon Ortner isn’t like most Western landscape photographers.
  • Mount Rainier National Park, Washington


    Mount Rainier National Park is located in western Washington State about 70 miles southeast of Seattle. Established in 1899, the park includes more than 235,000 acres.

Columns

  • Beware Of The Sun?


    A Burning Question • What’s A Pro Camera? • Prints From The Dark Side • When Things Get Wet



    I recently “went digital” with a Nikon D90. While exploring the user’s manual, I was surprised to read a warning to keep the sun well out of the frame when shooting backlit subjects.
  • New Perspective On Iconic Subjects


    How to move beyond the "stock" shot for better photos of popular subjects



    Travel photographers working in tourist destinations face a dilemma: the iconic view, skyline or structure of a place often is so well known and photographed that it’s almost impossible to come up with anything new.

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