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May 2007


  • Adobe Photoshop Lightroom

    Lightroom is a program designed for photographers and the way they work

    Adobe Photoshop Lightroom has grabbed the attention of many photographers, and for good reason. It’s a significantly different way of approaching images than Photoshop, Photoshop Elements or any other traditional image-processing software.
  • Make A Photo Book

    Showcase your talent with a book of your own photography

    It’s an experience that used to be reserved just for professional photographers, but now you can feel the pride of holding a book of your very own images laid out with the care and skill of a professional designer. And while slideshows are a great way to share your photos, books can be used as gifts, to promote your business or to build an entire library of your own photo books. They can even be used to present book ideas to a real publisher.
  • Regarding Light

    Become a student of light and you become a better photographer

    In my last column, I outlined what I consider to be the essential ingredients for a high-quality landscape photograph (OP, April 2007). I mentioned that the quality of light was one of those major ingredients. Certainly, this is an obvious part of good photography, but it merits further discussion. It’s one thing to photograph and hope for the best, even if you go out at the generally optimal times. It's another thing to be a disciple of light, a lifelong student of the nuances of light on the landscape. If you take time to study the lighting conditions that occur at your favorite locations over a long period of time, you’ll be doing what most landscape masters have done: become an expert on those locations.
  • The Sky Solution

    Using Photoshop to repair problem skies when the light is too contrasty for your film or sensor to record properly

    One of the great challenges I find with photography is the inability to capture the full range of tones and colors I see in a scene. My camera just isn’t capable of doing that. This Photoshop technique allows you to repair an image that didn’t record the original scene correctly, turning a throwaway shot into a photo suitable for framing.


  • Canon EOS-1D Mark III

    The world's fastest D-SLR can shoot 10.1-megapixel images at 10 fps‚Äîand that‚’s just for starters

    While Canon’s speed-king EOS-1D Mark II N digital SLR offered effective improvements over its excellent predecessor, those improvements weren’t earthshaking. But the changes to the new EOS-1D Mark III are astounding, covering everything from resolution and image quality to shooting speed, dust elimination and live viewing. As you glance through them, keep in mind that these improvements all come at the same list price as the Mark II when it debuted: $4,499!
  • Does Lens Speed Matter?

    Pros love their fast glass. Maybe they're onto something.

    When shopping for a new lens, you might encounter the desired focal length (or focal-length range, in a zoom lens) in more than one speed. For example, one camera manufacturer’s lineup includes 400mm ƒ/2.8, 400mm ƒ/4 and 400mm ƒ/5.6 supertelephotos. The ƒ/2.8 is 4.5 times larger in volume, 4.2 times heavier and costs $5,000 more than the ƒ/5.6. Is it worth it? Many wildlife and action photographers think it is.
  • Gadget Bag: The Long View

    Compact super-zoom cameras offer tremendous telephotos in portable packages

    Although photographers seem to always search for it, there’s no perfect camera. Some seek a compact size over all else, while others are willing to lug around larger camera kits to ensure they’re always ready with the right lenses. While there’s no one-size-fits-all camera, there is one camera category that does a remarkable job of pleasing a lot of people in a lot of ways.
  • In Focus: May 2007

    Capture crisp, high-definition video with an affordable, palm-sized camera. The Canon HV20 camcorder features a 10x optical zoom lens, 2.96-megapixel CMOS image sensor and DIGIC DV II image processor for shooting full HD resolution (1920 x 1080i) video with true-to-life color. The 24p Cinema Mode helps your footage look more like a professional film. The HV20 also comes with a microphone and earphone jacks, plus you can opt to record in standard definition mode.
  • Photoshop CS3

    Adobe's latest Photoshop sports a streamlined workspace and powerful new tools that solve old photographic challenges

    With every new version of Photoshop, photographers always ask, "What’s new that will be useful to me? "With the release of CS3, the answer is lots! Brand-new features do things that were previously impossible in Photoshop, and refinements make existing features more flexible and powerful. Let’s look at the new features first.

  • Sekonic DigitalMaster L-758DR Light Meter

    A new meter specifically designed for today's digital cameras

    The DigitalMaster L-758DR offers four light meters in one. It measures flash, ambient, incident or reflected light, and will customize them to your camera or film type. Measured values can also be mixed and stored for interchangeable readings in reflected and incident modes.
  • Toys of Summer

    Now is the most popular time of year to take to the trails and campsites of America. Having the right gear will keep you outdoors in comfort and safety.

    Serious outdoor photography tends to be a gear-intensive pursuit, not just with camera equipment, but also with the tools it takes to safely and comfortably scout the great outdoors. The shelter, footwear, clothing, gadgets and other outdoor accessories you choose can be just as important as your photo equipment in helping you get the right images—a fact to which anyone who has ever shivered themselves awake in a lousy sleeping bag or endured a leaky, drafty tent will attest. If you haven’t shopped for outdoor equipment lately, you’re in for a surprise.
    It’s lighter and more functional than ever, even if there’s the occasional associated sticker shock. When it comes to chasing the best outdoor photo situations, you’ll be glad you’re properly outfitted with items like these.


  • Convincing Images

    National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore believes photography can make a difference in helping protect the environment

    Imagine a dream National Geographic assignment: photographing America’s Gulf Coast from the tip of Florida to Brownsville, Texas. Who could resist traveling the coastline and capturing stunning images of sunsets and coastal beaches? But what Joel Sartore saw on his second assignment for the magazine turned out to be much more than pretty pictures for a national publication. He walked along debris-strewn beaches near Galveston. Recalls Sartore, "I saw dead dolphins and garbage that included medical waste and plastic bottles from around the world."
  • Far Northern Exposure

    The rugged mountains, sweeping vistas and sublime auroras are among the subjects waiting for your lens in Canada

    Photographing in the Far North during the summer is a great advantage because of the extended amount of time you get to spend with that long shadow-casting, low-hanging, sweet, warm light at sunrise and sunset. Mid-August to early September is my favorite time. Autumn colors start early there, mosquitoes and black flies will be on a serious decline, weather is generally more moderate, and the sun can hang near that horizon for an hour or more before finally setting. But that’s not all—the sun can then underlight any lingering clouds and turn the sky crimson for another 15 to 20 minutes of magic. Wait, there’s more! Because the nights start to get darker this time of year, chances for seeing and photographing the Northern Lights greatly increase. Sweet!


  • Black River Wildlife Management Area, New Jersey

    The Black River Wildlife Management Area (WMA), located in the township of Chester, is 12 miles west of Morristown and about one hour’s drive from New York City. This beautiful area, more than 3,000 acres in size, is easily accessible from routes 80, 206 and 513.
  • Going Beyond The Iconic Image

    Put your personal creative stamp on even the most overphotographed places

    All of us have places we’ve read about, seen pictures of and dreamed about one day visiting, but for one reason or another, the years go by, and we haven’t made that trip. With time, our mental image of that place changes, becomes molded and might even be narrowed by looking at the same photos of the place again and again.
  • Keeping It Simple

    Sticking With Film • Simpler Digital • Accessories • Simpler Image Handling • Beyond Simple

    Yes, the world is a complex place. Technology can be baffling. True, some people just seem to be dedicated to making things difficult, and I know, sometimes you’ve read this column and thought photography was getting to be too technical and full of "stuff." But what’s important is the end result: an image that communicates or motivates. There are many ways for you to achieve your photographic vision and it doesn’t have to be that hard.
  • Learning Together

    Photo workshops connect you to world-class instructors and fellow photographers for hands-on experience that will invigorate your photography

    No matter which photographic workshop you attend, you’re going to learn a lot "from the group leader as well as from your fellow workshop attendees. But don’t expect the knowledge to come in a series of bite-sized chunks like the photo tips you might share over a diet soda with a fellow photographer. Sure, you’ll encounter the basic pointers, like when to use a polarizer and how to determine which white-balance setting to use. But overall, the experience is much deeper than that. Attending a top photographic workshop is a bit like attending cooking school—the education gives you a recipe for lifelong photographic enjoyment, not merely advice regarding what spices to use to kick up a dish.
  • The Tipping Point

    Paying subjects to photograph them is a complex issue with no easy answers

    For anyone who travels and photographs, it’s an all-too-familiar scenario: You’re walking down a street in a far-off destination and you spot an interesting-looking local wearing the traditional clothing of the region—a wonderful potential portrait subject. You begin to approach the person to start up a conversation, and you’re sized up immediately: your clothes, your equipment, your lack of the language.

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