Sony SLT-A77

The latest translucent-mirror DSLR from Sony has a 24.3-megapixel sensor, with continuous phase-detection AF and eye-level viewing for stills and video
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The new SLT-A77 is the long-awaited successor to Sony's A700 enthusiast APS-C DSLR. In 2010, Sony introduced the first cameras with TMT (translucent mirror technology), the entry-level SLT-A55 and SLT-A33. A DSLR with a TMT system has a fixed mirror that transmits most of the light to the image sensor while simultaneously directing a portion of the light to the camera's phase-detection AF sensor.

Conventional DSLRs must alternate focusing and exposing, since the SLR mirror must be down for the former and up for the latter. TMT allows the camera to continuously autofocus and calculate exposure at the same time. This speeds up operation, minimizes moving parts and provides continuous quick phase-detection autofocusing for still and HD video shooting.

Sony A-Mount Lenses
Like all Sony DSLR and SLT cameras, the A77 can use the full line of Sony A-mount lenses, as well as legacy Minolta Maxxum lenses. Sony currently offers around 30 lenses, from a 16mm ƒ/2.8 fisheye and an 11-18mm superwide zoom to a 70-400mm telezoom, including true macro lenses.

Built-In GPS
A built-in GPS makes it easy to geotag your shots, no extra equipment needed.

New 24.3 MP APS-C Sensor
The A77 features a new 24.3-megapixel APS-C Sony Exmor HD CMOS sensor—24.3 megapixels is a third more pixels than any previous APS-C sensor. The new sensor and BIONZ processer provide improved low-light performance, with ISO settings up to 16,000.
12 fps At Full Resolution
The A77 can shoot its 24.3-megapixel images at 12 fps, with continuous phase-detection AF for each shot—great news for wildlife and sports-action shooters, in particular.
Rugged, Weather-Resistant Body
The body has a rugged structure of magnesium alloy, aluminum alloy, stainless steel and engineered plastic. The A77 is well sealed against weather and dust, as are its optional vertical grip, the HVL-F43AM flash unit and the new DT 16-50mm ƒ/2.87 SSM lens.


Image Sensor: 24.3-megapixel (effective) Exmor APS HD CMOS (APS-C size)
Lens Mount: Sony A-mount
Image Stabilization: Sensor-shift, Super SteadyShot
LCD Monitor: 3.0-inch, 921,600-dot TFT
Viewfinder: 1.3cm XGA OLED
Video: 1920x1080/60p and 24p, 24 Mb/s; MP4 1440x1080/30p, 12 Mb/s; 640x480/30p, 3 Mb/s
AF System: 19-point, 11 cross-type
Shutter Speeds: 1/8000 to 30 sec., X-sync up to 1⁄250 sec.
Flash: Built-in auto pop-up, GN 12 (meters, ISO 100); wireless control
ISO Settings: 100-16,000, ISO 50
Continuous Firing Mode: 12 fps
Metering: 1200-zone evaluative, CW, spot
Storage Medium: SD, SDHC, SDXC, MS PRO Duo, MS PRO-HG Duo
Recording Format: JPEG, RAW, RAW + JPEG
Dimensions: 5.6x4.1x3.2 inches (body)
Weight: 23.0 ounces
Estimated Street Price: $1,399
Contact: Sony,

This Article Features Photo Zoom
SteadyShot INSIDE Stabilization
When you can't use a tripod, Sony's SteadyShot INSIDE sensor-shift image stabilization helps produce sharper handheld images. Since it works by moving the image sensor itself rather than lens elements, you get stabilization with any lens you attach to the camera. And unlike the sensor-shift DSLRs, the A77 lets you see the effects of the stabilization, thanks to its OLED EVF.
Image Enhancers
Like other recent Sony DSLRs and TMT cameras, the A77 features Multi-Frame NR (the camera quickly shoots, then composites six images to reduce noise), Auto HDR (the camera shoots and combines the best of three bracketed images to extend detail from shadow through highlight) and Dynamic Range Optimizer (recovers shadow details while avoiding blowing out highlights in a single shot). Sweep Panorama mode makes it easy to create stitched panoramic images in-camera, handheld—even in 3D.
AVCHD Progressive Video
Employing the new AVCHD Progressive v2.0 standard, the A77 can shoot 1920x1080 full HD video at 60p (and 24p), with continuous phase-detection AF. A built-in stereo microphone and audio noise reduction enhance audio quality.

3-Way Tilting LCD Monitor
The 3.0-inch, 921,000-dot LCD monitor tilts and swivels for easy shooting at any angle—even when the camera is mounted on a tripod.

New XGA OLED Viewfinder
A key feature of the A77 is its new 2,359,296-dot (XGA) OLED electronic viewfinder, which offers much better resolution, contrast and response than the LCD-based EVFs, and provides convenient eye-level viewing for still and video shooting. The OLED finder can display exposure details, as well as preview effects of camera settings.

Essential Accesories

An accessory shotgun microphone kit like the new Que Audio Sniper Kit gives you dramatically improved audio quality and much more control over sound capture than the built-in DSLR mic.

Steadying Device
The Novoflex MMR Bluebird gives you a balanced, handheld platform for shooting action stills or video. A handheld device like this enhances the A77's built-in SteadyShot technology.

Light Control
The Rogue FlashBender system easily fits into your camera bag, weighs very little and turns your accessory flash into an incredibly useful outdoor device.


    How can Sony convince DSLR shooters to get into the system when they don’t have pro support, constantly change designs, can’t keep up with the competition product wise (on a consistent basis) and generally seem detracted from their enthusiast photographers?

    Doesn’t matter what Sony comes out with, if it has Sony on the name plate people will associate them with the TV ads they run- which are never photography product related.

    end of line

    As soon as we got over the idea that a camera has to have a mirror we will have room in the camera for some really neat stuff like inbuilt HDR area selection, better remote tool and bracketing, even via mobile phone. So many things to add.

    As a long time Minolta and then Sony user who currently uses an A700 I’ve never felt left out in the cold by Sony.

    I’ve used both Canon and Nikon and wasn’t overwhelmed by either, in fact in this level of cameras they both get their sensors from Sony.

    Both Canon and Nikon are working on their own translucent mirror designs so its more accurate to say that Sony is leading the field rather than following.

    I haven’t used any of the new Sonys so I’ll hold my opinion of them until I do but I won’t be very surprised if my next camera is also a Sony.

    #David Ridgley — which DSLR can you use without power? I have a light meter that does not need batteries. Let me know which DSLR we can use that doesn’t need power.

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