Can You Keep A Secret?

There may come a time when you have to post a photo on the web but are reluctant because you want to keep the metadata a secret

There may come a time when you have to post a photo on the web but are reluctant because you want to keep the metadata a secret. You may not want to advertise the focal length, time of capture, aperture, ISO, etc. Metadata shows the lens you use, the camera body and its serial number. You may find it’s best if this information does not go public. Metadata is displayed when you go to File>Get Info. In the Camera Data tab, the following information is available:

To strip the metadata and still maintain the original file size and look, here’s what to do:

Step 1: Open your image. If it has layers, flatten it. Go to Select>All or use the keyboard shortcut of Command A on a Mac or Control A on a PC.

Marching ants will now surround your image.

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Go to Edit>Copy or use the keyboard shortcut of Command C on a Mac or Control C on a PC.

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Step 2: Go to File>New or use the keyboard shortcut of Command N on a Mac or Control N on a PC.

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The New dialog box will appear and have the same dimensions as the photo you just copied. Note the identical width, height, resolution and image size. In the NAME field, re-title the photo if you want. Hit OK.

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Go to Edit>Paste or use the keyboard shortcut of Command V on a Mac or Control V on a PC.

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Step 3: The pasted file does not maintain the Camera Data. To confirm, go back to File>Get Info and the metadata is gone.

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Visit www.russburdenphotography.com

8 Comments

    Many or most of the non-DSLR digitals also store your location info. Which means pictures taken in your home will have your location/address. Also stored the time and date, which you might want to keep private.

    Jeff’s got the only reason I can think of not to include the metadata. Do any of us really have the rights, or have domain over anything we photograph, especially when it comes to landscapes, wildlife, etc.? We really need to worry that someone else gains the means to better themselves artistically? What are we really worried about? Advertising the equipment we use, what settings were used, really? Put a point-n-shoot in the hands of an artist, and he won’t care who knows any of it. Get over it.

    I photograph threatened snakes in Northwest Illinois and I would absolutely want to keep that information from others. People would poach the snakes to sell on the lucrative black market. There are many reasons in my opinion to hide that information. What if you are shooting a mountain lion at a den with kittens? Would that be wise to reveal the location?

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