5 Pro Guides For Black & White Landscape Photography

While some photographers tend to experiment with black-and-white on their computer as more of an afterthought after they’ve shot their images in color, more successful results can be achieved when a thoughtful process begins in the field. Here, five photographers share what they’ve learned during their monochrome journeys.

1. Monochrome Vision


A nature and wildlife photographer explains why he thinks black and white is the best choice for his photographic palette—a conclusion he came to after a lot of trial and error with printing, shooting and developing images, and after a struggle to reconnect with his work after a bad case of photographic writer’s block. Read more …

2. Think, Feel, Do


This step-by-step plan offers an easily digestible process for shooting black-and-white-photography. It’s an interesting look at learning to envision a full-color scene in black-and-white, developing a connection to the subject, and then getting outside your comfort zone and exploring opportunities. Read more …

3. Black & White In Harsh Light


We all know that the best time for color landscape photography is during the golden hours, and many photographers stay away from the harsh and contrasty midday light. However, the latter may offer some of the best conditions for black-and-white photography. Here are some things to consider. Read more …

4. Exploring Infrared Photography


If you’ve reached a creative block with your photography, or are just looking to try something new, infrared photography can unleash your creative vision. This guide discusses options such as using a filter or converting your camera, how to overcome challenges with focusing and exposure, and provides postprocessing tips. Read more …

5. See In Black & White


Previsualizing a scene in black-and-white takes some training, but it’s an incredibly important part of creating a successful black-and-white image. This article covers some of the basics, such as focusing on light instead of color, viewing shadows as forms, seeing colors as midtones, and more. Read more …


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