National Park Service Turns 103

Be prepared for your next trip to your favorite national park with one of our many travel guides

On August 25, 1916, the act that created the National Park Service was signed by President Woodrow Wilson, and this Sunday marks the National Park Service’s 103rd anniversary!

Below you’ll find detailed guides covering just 10 of the 61 U.S. national parks. Learn the best places to visit within the parks, techniques for all seasons, where to find wildlife and more to help you plan your next adventure. Be safe, respectful and prepared to photograph the beauty that this country’s protected lands have to offer.

Beautiful Oddities

Exploring the otherworldly landscapes of Joshua Tree National Park. Read now.

 

Boom, Baby!

Exploring the explosive beauty of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Read now.

 

Destination Yellowstone

Adam Jones on photographing the elements that give America’s first national park its out-of-this-world reputation. Read now.

 

Katmai National Park For Wildlife

The dramatic landscapes of Katmai National Park in southern Alaska are home to an abundance of wildlife photo opportunities. Read now.

 

Grand Canyon Hotspots

Tips and suggested locations for epic images of this celebrated natural wonder. Read now.

 

Olympic National Park

Encompassing three distinct ecosystems and incredible geographic diversity, this jewel of the Pacific Northwest is unlike any other national park. Read now.

 

Acadia National Park By Land And Sea

Insights for planning your visit to the first national park east of the Mississippi. Read now.

 

Theodore Roosevelt National Park

This park in North Dakota features a unique landscape of channeled cliffs, gullies, hoodoos, caprocks, wind-swept prairie grasses and dome-shaped hills. Read now.

 

Winter Wildlife In Grand Teton

For photographing wildlife in winter, it’s hard to beat the abundance of opportunity and majestic surroundings in Jackson Hole. Read now.

 

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Morton Overlook is a vantage point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park that’s arguably one of the best places in the part to catch the sunset. Read now.

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