Traversing the Patagonian Ice Cap: A new breed of expedition-style Workshops

1425398934682Earlier this year I was approached by Vertical Shot Expeditions. They inquired if I would be interested in leading an expedition to traverse the Patagonian Ice Cap in 2016. Having spent a fair bit of time in Torres del Paine National Park in southern Chile, and having seen the ice cap several times, traversing the ice cap has been on my “bucket” list for some time. Hence, when I got the email about leading this expedition it was a no brainer. I signed on immediately.

This expedition also happens to be a photography workshop of sorts as we are looking for six adventurous souls to come along with myself and two expert guides (who know the ice cap very well) that will accompany us. We already have a few folks who have signed on. This is a new breed of workshops, where participants will have a bonified adventure while learning about photography. Phenomenal images will be out there all around us at all hours of the day and no matter what happens, we will come back with insanely cool images.

On this expedition, we will have eleven days to really explore the craft of photography in-depth as we traverse the ice cap. Unlike many of my workshops that explore the world of adventure sports for four or five days, this workshop will be an adventure in and of itself and an extensive time to really put into action a wide variety of photographic techniques. If you have ever wanted to follow me along on a real-world shoot this is your chance.

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As the Vertical Shot Expeditions website says, “this is a strenuous trek in a harsh environment. No technical skills or previous glacier walking experience are required, but it is a must to have camping and trekking experience prior to starting the expedition. You should be fit to hike with a 50 pound (25 kg) backpack for 6-8 hours per day.”

This expedition will be the most realistic workshop experience I have ever been a part of. Every possible issue that comes up on my assignments will come into play on this trip, including camping in remote regions, dealing with cold, wet conditions, making wise choices about camera and outdoor gear as well as thinking critically about the images while out on an extensive shoot. Once we get back to civilization, we also have a full day scheduled to edit and work up images and critique them as well. I predict this will be the most exciting photo expedition I have ever been a part of. If you are in shape and have the time, I hope you can join us on this incredible adventure. For all the glorious details check out the Vertical Shot Expedition website. Please note that Vertical Shot Expeditions is a European Company and all payments will go through them. Please email me if you have any questions.

5 Comments

    Sorry for being a language snob, but I think you meant ‘bona fide’. With a little imagination, however, bonified becomes an interesting new word.

    I regularly haul 40 pounds of glass and cameras around on my back while out on a trek of very mild conditions. I’ve lasted a couple hours without being crippled. Based on these experiences I’ve had in the mountains of Washington, I have to say that this will be a greuling and painful adventure for all but the most proficient athletes. Enjoy the trek!

    I regularly haul 40 pounds of glass and cameras around on my back while out on a trek of very mild conditions. I’ve lasted a couple hours without being crippled. Based on these experiences I’ve had in the mountains of Washington, I have to say that this will be a greuling and painful adventure for all but the most proficient athletes. Enjoy the trek!

    Another obstacle to a successful traverse of the ice cap is crevasses, both on the Marconi Glacier on the way up to the ice cap and at the mouth to Circos de los Altares. The largest of these crevasses, 30 metres across, even has a name, La Sumidero.

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