WILDSpeak 2016: Amy Gulick

Amy Gulick Author Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rainforest
Amy Gulick, Author, Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rainforest

Amy Gulick, an acclaimed photographer and writer, and Outdoor Photographer columnist, is one of many highly anticipated presenters who will explore how photography and video are impacting conservation efforts around the globe at the International League of Conservation Photographers' WILDspeak Symposium, November 15 & 16, 2016, in Washington D.C. Gulick’s presentation will be on Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rain Forest.

In the Tongass National Forest of Alaska, bears play a significant role in spreading nutrient-packed salmon carcasses throughout the forest. Scientists have discovered a marine nitrogen in trees near spawning streams that links directly back to the fish. ©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
In the Tongass National Forest of Alaska, bears play a significant role in spreading nutrient-packed salmon carcasses throughout the forest. Scientists have discovered a marine nitrogen in trees near spawning streams that links directly back to the fish. ©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com

“I am a firm believer in the power of images and words to engage people on an emotional level and shape public opinion for the greater good,” says Gulick on what she strives to accomplish with her work. “As a photographer, my work has to make people both fall in love with my subjects and understand their significance. Much of my work focuses on wild lands and intact ecosystems—forests, oceans, etc. —and why these things matter.”

Gulick has succeeded in creating a connection between her images and the viewer, and she’s been recognized with many honors including the Daniel Housberg Wilderness Image Award from the Alaska Conservation Foundation, the Voice of the Wild Award from the Alaska Wilderness League, and a Lowell Thomas Award from the Society of American Travel Writers Foundation.

Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska’s Tongass Rain Forest by Amy Gulick is the recipient of an Independent Publisher Book Award, as well as two Nautilus Book Awards that recognize books that promote conscious living and positive social change.
Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska’s Tongass Rain Forest by Amy Gulick is the recipient of an Independent Publisher Book Award, as well as two Nautilus Book Awards that recognize books that promote conscious living and positive social change.

Her multimedia project, Salmon in the Trees, was created to educate people about the Tongass rain forest of Alaska. The project consists of traveling exhibits, lectures, YouTube videos and a book, the latter being the recipient of an Independent Publisher Book Award and two Nautilus Book Awards. “My ongoing work features the Tongass National Forest of Alaska, which contains one-third of the world's remaining old-growth coastal temperate rain forest,” she explains. “It's a place where the cycle of life is whole—all of the species that existed at the time of European settlement are still there—brown bears, humpback whales, Steller sea lions, and millions of Pacific wild salmon. My book, ‘Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rain Forest,’ highlights a remarkable ecological connection between the salmon and forests of this magnificent part of the world.”

In the Tongass National Forest of Alaska, wild salmon provide food for many different species. Due to the abundance of salmon, the Tongass boasts the world’s highest nesting density of bald eagles, as well as some of the world’s highest densities of both brown and black bears. ©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com
In the Tongass National Forest of Alaska, wild salmon provide food for many different species. Due to the abundance of salmon, the Tongass boasts the world’s highest nesting density of bald eagles, as well as some of the world’s highest densities of both brown and black bears. ©Amy Gulick/amygulick.com

Gulick’s work on Salmon in the Trees inspired her current project, which focuses on the major salmon-producing regions of Alaska and explores the relationship between the salmon and the people who live in those areas. “That people can still have a strong relationship with wild—whether it's commercial fishing, sport fishing, subsistence, etc.—is remarkable given the devastating loss of salmon in other parts of the world,” she says.

Join Gulick in Washington D.C. in November to learn more about her work in conservation. “At WildSpeak, my talk, ‘Salmon in the Trees,’ focuses on the Tongass National Forest of Alaska and why the connection that still exists there between salmon and trees is critical for maintaining the ecological integrity of the region for both wild and human communities. I'll also talk about the role that photography can play in collaborative conservation.”

To learn more, visit www.amygulick.com and www.salmoninthetrees.org.

 

 

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